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Solutions for Chapter 4.5: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data 4th Edition

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321757272 | Authors: Michael Sullivan, III

Full solutions for Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780321757272

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321757272 | Authors: Michael Sullivan, III

Solutions for Chapter 4.5

Solutions for Chapter 4.5
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Textbook: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data
Edition: 4
Author: Michael Sullivan, III
ISBN: 9780321757272

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data , edition: 4. Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321757272. Since 46 problems in chapter 4.5 have been answered, more than 151784 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 4.5 includes 46 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alias

    In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Exhaustive

    A property of a collection of events that indicates that their union equals the sample space.

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

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