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Textbooks / Statistics / Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach 9

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073534985

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 33. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 09/01/17, 05:46AM. Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073534985. Since problems from 33 chapters in Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach have been answered, more than 323868 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach , edition: 9.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Consistent estimator

    An estimator that converges in probability to the true value of the estimated parameter as the sample size increases.

  • Continuous random variable.

    A random variable with an interval (either inite or ininite) of real numbers for its range.

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Curvilinear regression

    An expression sometimes used for nonlinear regression models or polynomial regression models.

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Designed experiment

    An experiment in which the tests are planned in advance and the plans usually incorporate statistical models. See Experiment

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.