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Textbooks / Statistics / Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach 9

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073534985

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Solutions by Chapter
4 5 0 280 Reviews
Textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach
Edition: 9
Author: Allan Bluman
ISBN: 9780073534985

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 33. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 09/01/17, 05:46AM. Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073534985. Since problems from 33 chapters in Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach have been answered, more than 645562 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach , edition: 9.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Adjusted R 2

    A variation of the R 2 statistic that compensates for the number of parameters in a regression model. Essentially, the adjustment is a penalty for increasing the number of parameters in the model. Alias. In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Attribute

    A qualitative characteristic of an item or unit, usually arising in quality control. For example, classifying production units as defective or nondefective results in attributes data.

  • Attribute control chart

    Any control chart for a discrete random variable. See Variables control chart.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

  • Goodness of fit

    In general, the agreement of a set of observed values and a set of theoretical values that depend on some hypothesis. The term is often used in itting a theoretical distribution to a set of observations.

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .