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Solutions for Chapter 1.4: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach 9th Edition

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073534985

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Solutions for Chapter 1.4

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 1.4 includes 12 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach , edition: 9. Since 12 problems in chapter 1.4 have been answered, more than 170976 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073534985.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k factorial experiment.

    A full factorial experiment with k factors and all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each.

  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Alias

    In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Attribute control chart

    Any control chart for a discrete random variable. See Variables control chart.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Continuous random variable.

    A random variable with an interval (either inite or ininite) of real numbers for its range.

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Defect

    Used in statistical quality control, a defect is a particular type of nonconformance to speciications or requirements. Sometimes defects are classiied into types, such as appearance defects and functional defects.

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Exponential random variable

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Generator

    Effects in a fractional factorial experiment that are used to construct the experimental tests used in the experiment. The generators also deine the aliases.

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