×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide

Solutions for Chapter 6.2: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach 9th Edition

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073534985

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Solutions for Chapter 6.2

Solutions for Chapter 6.2
4 5 0 407 Reviews
29
0
Textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach
Edition: 9
Author: Allan Bluman
ISBN: 9780073534985

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073534985. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 36 problems in chapter 6.2 have been answered, more than 123892 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 6.2 includes 36 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach , edition: 9.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Chi-square (or chi-squared) random variable

    A continuous random variable that results from the sum of squares of independent standard normal random variables. It is a special case of a gamma random variable.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • Fraction defective

    In statistical quality control, that portion of a number of units or the output of a process that is defective.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide
×
Reset your password