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Solutions for Chapter 7.3: Confidence Intervals and Sample Size for Proportions

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073534985

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073534985 | Authors: Allan Bluman

Solutions for Chapter 7.3: Confidence Intervals and Sample Size for Proportions

Summary of Chapter 7.3: Confidence Intervals and Sample Size for Proportions

One of the most common types of confidence intervals is one that uses proportions.

Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073534985. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step By Step Approach , edition: 9. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 7.3: Confidence Intervals and Sample Size for Proportions includes 11 full step-by-step solutions. Since 11 problems in chapter 7.3: Confidence Intervals and Sample Size for Proportions have been answered, more than 667459 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Cause-and-effect diagram

    A chart used to organize the various potential causes of a problem. Also called a ishbone diagram.

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Continuous random variable.

    A random variable with an interval (either inite or ininite) of real numbers for its range.

  • Control limits

    See Control chart.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Exponential random variable

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Gamma random variable

    A random variable that generalizes an Erlang random variable to noninteger values of the parameter r