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In discussing the two carts of Figure 11.1, I mentioned

Classical Mechanics | 0th Edition | ISBN: 9781891389221 | Authors: John R Taylor ISBN: 9781891389221 90

Solution for problem 11.1 Chapter 11

Classical Mechanics | 0th Edition

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Classical Mechanics | 0th Edition | ISBN: 9781891389221 | Authors: John R Taylor

Classical Mechanics | 0th Edition

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Problem 11.1

In discussing the two carts of Figure 11.1, I mentioned that it is simplest to assume that when the two carts are in equilibrium the lengths L 1, L2, L3 of the three springs are equal to their natural, unstretched lengths /1, /2, /3. However, this assumption is not needed, and the three springs could all be in tension (or compression) at the equilibrium position. (a) Find the relations among these six lengths (and the three spring constants k1, k2, k3) required for the two carts to be in equilibrium. (b) Show that the net force on either cart is exactly as given in Equation (11.2), irrespective of how L1, L2, L3 compare with /1, /2, /3, just as long as x1 and x2 are measured from the carts' equilibrium positions.

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equilibrium Benefits of Exchange - Benefits of Exchange • voluntary exchange is based on mutual benefits • if agree to trade, then both parties must perceive net benefits, or else would not engage in voluntary trade - Net Benefits: - consumer: consumer surplus - supplier: producer surplus Gains From Trade - Demand Curve (Consumers): Recall, the height of the demand curve at a given quantity...

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Chapter 11, Problem 11.1 is Solved
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Textbook: Classical Mechanics
Edition: 0
Author: John R Taylor
ISBN: 9781891389221

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Classical Mechanics, edition: 0. Since the solution to 11.1 from 11 chapter was answered, more than 354 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. Classical Mechanics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781891389221. The answer to “In discussing the two carts of Figure 11.1, I mentioned that it is simplest to assume that when the two carts are in equilibrium the lengths L 1, L2, L3 of the three springs are equal to their natural, unstretched lengths /1, /2, /3. However, this assumption is not needed, and the three springs could all be in tension (or compression) at the equilibrium position. (a) Find the relations among these six lengths (and the three spring constants k1, k2, k3) required for the two carts to be in equilibrium. (b) Show that the net force on either cart is exactly as given in Equation (11.2), irrespective of how L1, L2, L3 compare with /1, /2, /3, just as long as x1 and x2 are measured from the carts' equilibrium positions.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 131 words. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 11.1 from chapter: 11 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 09/09/17, 04:12AM. This full solution covers the following key subjects: carts, Equilibrium, Lengths, springs, however. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 16 chapters, and 736 solutions.

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