×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data - 5 Edition - Chapter 6.2 - Problem 51
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data - 5 Edition - Chapter 6.2 - Problem 51

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

?Overbooking Flights Historically, the probability that a passenger will miss a flight is 0.0995. Source: Passenger-Based Predictive Modeling of Airlin

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780134133539 | Authors: Michael Sullivan III ISBN: 9780134133539 240

Solution for problem 51 Chapter 6.2

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780134133539 | Authors: Michael Sullivan III

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition

4 5 1 287 Reviews
13
3
Problem 51

Overbooking Flights Historically, the probability that a passenger will miss a flight is 0.0995. Source: Passenger-Based Predictive Modeling of Airline No-show Rates by Richard D. Lawrence, Se June Hong, and Jacques Cherrier. Airlines do not like flights with empty seats, but it is also not desirable to have overbooked flights because passengers must be “bumped” from the flight. The Lockheed L49 Constellation has a seating capacity of 54 passengers.

(a) If 56 tickets are sold, what is the probability 55 or 56 passengers show up for the flight resulting in an overbooked flight?

(b) Suppose 60 tickets are sold, what is the probability a passenger will have to be “bumped”?

(c) For a plane with seating capacity of 250 passengers, how many tickets may be sold to keep the probability of a passenger being “bumped” below 1%?

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) Overbooking Flights Historically, the probability that a passenger will miss a flight is 0.0995. Source: Passenger-Based Predictive Modeling of Airline No-show Rates by Richard D. Lawrence, Se June Hong, and Jacques Cherrier. Airlines do not like flights with empty seats, but it is also not desirable to have overbooked flights because passengers must be “bumped” from the flight. The Lockheed L49 Constellation has a seating capacity of 54 passengers. (a) If 56 tickets are sold, what is the probability 55 or 56 passengers show up for the flight resulting in an overbooked flight (b) Suppose 60 tickets are sold, what is the probability a passenger will have to be “bumped” (c) For a plane with seating capacity of 250 passengers, how many tickets may be sold to keep the probability of a passenger being “bumped” below 1% Whenever designing an experiment or survey, it is good practice to determine b for the level of a chosen.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 6.2, Problem 51 is Solved
Textbook: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data
Edition: 5
Author: Michael Sullivan III
ISBN: 9780134133539

Other solutions

Discover and learn what students are asking




Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data : Data Collection
?What is meant by the process of statistics?

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data : Assessing Normality
?A ______ ______ ______is a graph that plots observed data versus normal scores








People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

?Overbooking Flights Historically, the probability that a passenger will miss a flight is 0.0995. Source: Passenger-Based Predictive Modeling of Airlin