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Solved: Determine the force P needed to hold the cable in

Engineering Mechanics: Statics | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780133918922 | Authors: Russell C. Hibbeler ISBN: 9780133918922 126

Solution for problem 7-101 Chapter 7

Engineering Mechanics: Statics | 14th Edition

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Engineering Mechanics: Statics | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780133918922 | Authors: Russell C. Hibbeler

Engineering Mechanics: Statics | 14th Edition

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Problem 7-101

Determine the force P needed to hold the cable in the position shown, i.e., so segment BC remains horizontal. Also, compute the sag yB and the maximum tension in the cable. 4 m 6 m 3 m 2 m 4 kN P 6 kN yB 3 m A B C D E Prob. 7101

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Tuesday, April 12, 2016 Week 3 Lecture 5 - April 12, 2016 - The Research Process (continued) • Causal relationship between variables - Ex.) Violent TV viewing produces aggressive behavior - Different Methods for Testing Different Relationships • Survey/Observational Research (Researcher A) - Tests associations (just relationships/correlations) • Measure/observe some attitudes/behaviors and correlate them • Or compare existing groups of people on some measure - Great for external validity (are our findings valid for things outside the research lab) • Ability to generalize results to other people (if use representative sample) • …and to “normal life” settings (if observe or ask people about normal behavior) - Poor for causality! • Experimental Research (Researcher B) - Tests causal connections • Manipulate variables (separate people into groups and give different “treatment” to each group) • Control everything else • Measure effects - Great for internal validity (ability to establish that X causes Y) • *Not just connection between variables but also establishes time order • Rules out “confounding” variables (other explanations) - Poor for generalizability! 1 Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - Defining Concepts and Variables • Variables in Experimental Research (testing cause/effect) - Independent Variable (IV) • Variable manipulated by researcher • The “cause” in cause-effect relationship - Dependent Variable (DV) Variable affected/changed by the IV • • The “effect” or outcome - Example Hypothesis: greater physical attractiveness creates impressions of greater friendliness IV = Physical attractiveness (manipulate high vs low attractiveness) • • DV = Impressions of friendliness - Variables in Survey/Observational Research (testing associations) • Can’t be cause-effect so… - IV considered a “predictor” variable - DV is what is being predicted by IV (sometimes called “criterion” variable) • Example Hypothesis: the stronger a person’s “fan” identity the greater their participation in online forums - IV = Fan indication (rate how strongly connected to fandom) - DV = Fan forum participation (measure how often people post/read posts) • Could the IV and DV be the other way around in this survey YES - Participation predicts identity —> same relationship - Types of Relationships Between Variables • Association between variables - X is connected/related to Y 2 Tuesday, April 12, 2016 • Ex.) The more TV violence children watch the more aggressive they are (more of something predicts more of something else) OR aggressive kids watch more violence than do non-aggressive kids (can also connect gender) • Causal Relationships between variables - X influences/affects/changes Y • Conceptualizing your variables - Defining what the concepts mean for purposes of investigation • Usually based on theory/prior research - Example variable: “fear”… what is it • Operationalizing your variables - Deciding exactly how the concepts will be measured (or manipulated) in a study Lecture 6 - April 14, 2016 - Measurement - Operationalizing Variables • We have to first conceptualize - what is fear Define it • Some tactics work on kids but not adults - Adults can better hide their emotions • Types of Measures - Physiological measures • BP, brain imaging, cortisol (stress hormone), heart rate, pupil dilation (good for arousal studies) - Behavioral measures • Observing people’s actual behavior; nonverbal gestures, time/money spent, actual posts on social media - Self-Report measures • Items on questionnaire • Doesn’t always work with kids 3 Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - “How does that make you feel” … “Fine.” • Can still be on a scale (strongly agree/strongly disagree) • Measures should: - Have good conceptual fit with variables in the hypothesis/RQs - Capture variation - Minimalize social desirability effects Typically with self-report measures • - People’s memories are not very accurate - Do the participants tell the truth always • No - questions like “how prejudiced are you”… People don’t want to think they’re racist • People may alter response/behavior for an experiment/survey - Less of an issue with physiological measures • Levels of Measurement - Nominal (categorical/discrete) measurement: variable is measured merely with different categories • Nominal measures are for comparing differences - Between manipulated IV conditions in experiments - Between existing IV groups in surveys • Eye color, political party/ideology, ethnicity, TV use (high/low), yes/no questions - Ordinal measures: variable is measured with rank ordered categories • Rank of top 5 favorite TV shows, most to least important political issue • You can’t have a sense of how much more important one thing is over another 1… 2, 3, 4, 5 - But 2-5 are pretty equal 4 Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - Interval measurement: variable is measured with successive points on a scale with equal intervals • Ex.) On immigration policy position: “The US should increase border security”. Strongly oppose or strongly agree on a scale - Normally 5 or 7 - Numbers don’t mean anything unless scaled together - Ratio measurement: interval measurement with an absolute zero • Time in hours, weight in pounds, age in years, test scores • Interval and ratio are both continuous variables - Allow you to capture more variation - You want to get as much variation as possible - Can always collapse categories if need be - Allow you to compare means - Allows you to test continuous relationships between variables • The more X, the more Y —> positive The more X, the less Y —> negative • - Questionnaire Items as measures • Don’t use “survey” to describe a questionnaire - There are items on a questionnaire - Common for IVs and DVs in surveys - Common for DVs in experiments • IV is a manipulation into groups • Types of questionnaire items - Open-ended • Respondents give their own answer to questions • You don’t want to prime them with a response, but there is way more data to sift through at the end 5 Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - Closed-ended • Respondents select from a list of choices • Choices must be mutually exclusive • Choices must be exhaustive - All options must be there Section - April 14, 2016 - Conceptualization • A definition that fits your research, not necessarily a dictionary definition - Answers the question “what is it” - Operationalization Taking your conceptual definition and turning it into something unique and specific • to your study - Two ways of looking at different variables: • Association: correlation or a relationship Causal: cause and effect (X causes Y) • - Review of previous study - brand placement/recall in hip-hop songs • How it can be improved 6

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Chapter 7, Problem 7-101 is Solved
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Textbook: Engineering Mechanics: Statics
Edition: 14
Author: Russell C. Hibbeler
ISBN: 9780133918922

The answer to “Determine the force P needed to hold the cable in the position shown, i.e., so segment BC remains horizontal. Also, compute the sag yB and the maximum tension in the cable. 4 m 6 m 3 m 2 m 4 kN P 6 kN yB 3 m A B C D E Prob. 7101” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 54 words. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 7-101 from chapter: 7 was answered by , our top Engineering and Tech solution expert on 11/10/17, 05:25PM. Engineering Mechanics: Statics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780133918922. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Engineering Mechanics: Statics, edition: 14. Since the solution to 7-101 from 7 chapter was answered, more than 534 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This full solution covers the following key subjects: cable, needed, compute, determine, Force. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 11 chapters, and 1136 solutions.

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Solved: Determine the force P needed to hold the cable in