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The rank-sum test is sometimes thought of as a test for

Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401331 | Authors: William Navidi ISBN: 9780073401331 38

Solution for problem 17SE Chapter 6

Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

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Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401331 | Authors: William Navidi

Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

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Problem 17SE

The rank-sum test is sometimes thought of as a test for population medians. Under the assumptions of equal spread and shape, the means of two populations will differ if and only if the medians differ; therefore tests for equality of population means are also tests for equality of population medians. This exercise illustrates that when these assumptions are seriously violated, the rank-sum test can give misleading results concerning the equality of population medians. Consider the following two samples:

a. Show that both samples have the same median.

b. Compute the P-value for a two-tailed rank-sum test. If small P-values provide evidence against the null hypothesis that the population medians are equal, would you conclude that the population medians are different?

c. Do the assumptions of the rank-sum test appear to be satisfied? Explain why or why not.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

ANTHRO 2020 March 16, 2016 Early Woodlands (3000 – 1800 BP): Bridge-top mounds, small hamlets Sedentism- sedentary populations versus moving populations Small mounds located in the middle of a flood terrace Middle Woodland (1800 – 1300 BP) Hopewell Complex- name of a farmer who had a Hopewell mound on his farm (Morticai Hopewell)  There are enormous mounds, but in this tradition you re seeing very large mound centers, with walls and enclosed. There are a number of them in the Scioto Valley.  They seem to be places where people meet annually. Temporary leaders for each meeting  Find pits of blades without any wear one them  Animal bones, carvings that look like alligators, here in the Ohio Valley and Illinois Fort Ancient  Actually Late Woodland, but they were originally thought to be from the Middle Woodland  Mounds and pits throughout, pits were there to fill with water.  Argues that there would be a village in the middle of it. Newark Earthworks  Enormous site that stretches very far.  The great Newark road, is this roadway that heads off towards Chillicothe and continues all the way there. Maize  It really takes off in the Ohio Valley (1500-1200 years ago) Bow and Arrow  Using sticks and refining the point for easier hunting for smaller or larger animals  Late Woodland (1300 – 900 BP) Monks Mound  Socially complex people in north America Cahokia  Sports similar to lacrosse (found sticks and rocks shaped like

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Chapter 6, Problem 17SE is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Statistics for Engineers and Scientists
Edition: 4
Author: William Navidi
ISBN: 9780073401331

Since the solution to 17SE from 6 chapter was answered, more than 324 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This full solution covers the following key subjects: population, medians, test, sum, Rank. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 153 chapters, and 2440 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 17SE from chapter: 6 was answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 06/28/17, 11:15AM. Statistics for Engineers and Scientists was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073401331. The answer to “?The rank-sum test is sometimes thought of as a test for population medians. Under the assumptions of equal spread and shape, the means of two populations will differ if and only if the medians differ; therefore tests for equality of population means are also tests for equality of population medians. This exercise illustrates that when these assumptions are seriously violated, the rank-sum test can give misleading results concerning the equality of population medians. Consider the following two samples: a. Show that both samples have the same median.b. Compute the P-value for a two-tailed rank-sum test. If small P-values provide evidence against the null hypothesis that the population medians are equal, would you conclude that the population medians are different?c. Do the assumptions of the rank-sum test appear to be satisfied? Explain why or why not.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 135 words. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics for Engineers and Scientists , edition: 4.

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