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Construct Your Own the work done by a spinning skater pulling her arms in to increase

College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168932 | Authors: Gregg Wolfe, Irina Lyublinskaya, Douglas Ingram ISBN: 9781938168932 372

Solution for problem 35 Chapter 10

College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition

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College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168932 | Authors: Gregg Wolfe, Irina Lyublinskaya, Douglas Ingram

College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition

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Problem 35

Construct Your Own the work done by a spinning skater pulling her arms in to increase her rate of spin. Construct a problem in which you calculate the work done with a force multiplied by distance calculation and compare it to the skater's increase in kinetic energy.

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Fluids Pressure and Density ● Gas- molecules are free and interacting, and are considered fluids ○ Compressible- a consequence of empty space between molecules ● Liquids- molecules are bonded weakly and slide past each other ○ Incompressible and takes the shape of the container Density ● Liquids are characterized by their density ○ 3 ● Units are kg/m ● Since liquids occupy a volume it is important to remember how to convert a volume. 3 Remember that volumes should be in m basic SI unit. Pressure ● Pressure is most easily defined as force per unit area ○ P=F/A ● Atmospheric Pressure ○ ● Since atmospheric pressure acts uniformly in all directions, we don’t usually notice it. Therefore, if you want to, say, add air to your tires to the manufacturer’s specification, you are not interested in the total pressure. What you are interested in is the gauge pressure – how much more pressure is there in the tire than in the Atmosphere ○ ● Pressure is the same at the same depth. ○ P=P 0ρg h ○ Pressure = atmospheric pressure +gravity*density of fluid*height Pascal’s Principle ● Any change in pressure at any point in a fluid is transmitted to every other point in the fluid. Archimedes’ Principle ● Any body completely or partially submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force whose magnitude is equal to the weight

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Chapter 10, Problem 35 is Solved
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Textbook: College Physics for AP® Courses
Edition: 1
Author: Gregg Wolfe, Irina Lyublinskaya, Douglas Ingram
ISBN: 9781938168932

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Construct Your Own the work done by a spinning skater pulling her arms in to increase