×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Science - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Science - Textbook Survival Guide

When human cancer cells are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light at 90 mJ/cm2, most of the

Molecular Biology of the Cell | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780815344322 | Authors: Bruce Alberts ISBN: 9780815344322 455

Solution for problem 18-7 Chapter Chapter 18

Molecular Biology of the Cell | 6th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Molecular Biology of the Cell | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780815344322 | Authors: Bruce Alberts

Molecular Biology of the Cell | 6th Edition

4 5 1 433 Reviews
22
0
Problem 18-7

When human cancer cells are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light at 90 mJ/cm2, most of the cells undergo apoptosis within 24 hours. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria can be detected as early as 6 hours after exposure of a population of cells to UV light, and it continues to increase for more than 10 hours thereafter. Does this mean that individual cells slowly release their cytochrome c over this time period? Or, alternatively, do individual cells release their cytochrome c rapidly but with different cells being triggered over the longer time period? To answer this fundamental question, you have fused the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the gene for cytochrome c, so that you can observe the behavior of individual cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy. In cells that are expressing the cytochrome cGFP fusion, fluorescence shows the punctate pattern typical of mitochondrial proteins. You then irradiate these cells with UV light and observe individual cells for changes in the punctate pattern. Two such cells (outlined in white) are shown in Figure Q182A and B. Release of cytochrome cGFP is detected as a change from a punctate to a diffuse pattern of fluorescence. Times after UV exposure are indicated as hours:minutes below the individual panels. Which model for cytochrome c release do these observations support? Explain your reasoning.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Continued with additional information from January 12th, 2018 When we're talking about how atoms interact, we’re talking about if bonds are formed. Losing electrons gives a positive charge, gaining electrons gives a negative charge. Covalent bonding is the sharing of electrons. It can occur two ways, non-polar and polar. Carbon always shares. Hydrogen bonds happen between positive and negative...

Step 2 of 3

Chapter Chapter 18, Problem 18-7 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Molecular Biology of the Cell
Edition: 6
Author: Bruce Alberts
ISBN: 9780815344322

Since the solution to 18-7 from Chapter 18 chapter was answered, more than 220 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. Molecular Biology of the Cell was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780815344322. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 23 chapters, and 324 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Molecular Biology of the Cell, edition: 6. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 18-7 from chapter: Chapter 18 was answered by , our top Science solution expert on 03/16/18, 03:18PM. The answer to “When human cancer cells are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light at 90 mJ/cm2, most of the cells undergo apoptosis within 24 hours. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria can be detected as early as 6 hours after exposure of a population of cells to UV light, and it continues to increase for more than 10 hours thereafter. Does this mean that individual cells slowly release their cytochrome c over this time period? Or, alternatively, do individual cells release their cytochrome c rapidly but with different cells being triggered over the longer time period? To answer this fundamental question, you have fused the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the gene for cytochrome c, so that you can observe the behavior of individual cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy. In cells that are expressing the cytochrome cGFP fusion, fluorescence shows the punctate pattern typical of mitochondrial proteins. You then irradiate these cells with UV light and observe individual cells for changes in the punctate pattern. Two such cells (outlined in white) are shown in Figure Q182A and B. Release of cytochrome cGFP is detected as a change from a punctate to a diffuse pattern of fluorescence. Times after UV exposure are indicated as hours:minutes below the individual panels. Which model for cytochrome c release do these observations support? Explain your reasoning.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 220 words.

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

When human cancer cells are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light at 90 mJ/cm2, most of the

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Science - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Science - Textbook Survival Guide
×
Reset your password