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Solutions for Chapter 2: The Components of Matter

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780077216504 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780077216504

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780077216504 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Solutions for Chapter 2: The Components of Matter

Solutions for Chapter 2
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change
Edition: 5
Author: Martin S. Silberberg
ISBN: 9780077216504

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 2: The Components of Matter includes 158 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, edition: 5. Since 158 problems in chapter 2: The Components of Matter have been answered, more than 105513 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780077216504.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alpha decay

    A type of radioactive decay in which an atomic nucleus emits an alpha particle and thereby transforms (or “decays”) into an atom with a mass number 4 less and atomic number 2 less. (Section 21.1)

  • axial position

    For chair conformations of substituted cyclohexanes, a position that is parallel to a vertical axis passing through the center of the ring.

  • bimolecular reaction

    An elementary reaction that involves two molecules. (Section 14.6)

  • Bonding molecular orbital

    A molecular orbital in which electrons have a lower energy than they would in isolated atomic orbitals

  • bonding molecular orbital

    A molecular orbital in which the electron density is concentrated in the internuclear region. The energy of a bonding molecular orbital is lower than the energy of the separate atomic orbitals from which it forms. (Section 9.7)

  • electromotive force (emf)

    A measure of the driving force, or electrical pressure, for the completion of an electrochemical reaction. Electromotive force is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called the cell potential. (Section 20.4)

  • enthalpy of formation

    The enthalpy change that accompanies the formation of a substance from the most stable forms of its component elements. (Section 5.7)

  • Fischer esterifi cation

    The process of forming an ester by refl uxing a carboxylic acid and an alcohol in the presence of an acid catalyst, commonly H2SO4, ArSO3H, or HCl

  • group

    Elements that are in the same column of the periodic table; elements within the same group or family exhibit similarities in their chemical behavior. (Section 2.5)

  • Haloalkane (alkyl halide)

    A compound containing a halogen atom covalently bonded to an sp3 -hybridized carbon atom. Given the symbol R!X.

  • Hydroperoxide

    A compound containing an !OOH group.

  • imine

    A compound containing a CRN bond.

  • lattice points

    Points in a crystal all of which have identical environments. (Section 12.2)

  • living polymer

    A polymer that isformed via anionic polymerization.

  • magnetic moment

    A magneticfield generated by a spinning proton.

  • methyl shift

    A type of carbocation rearrangement in which a methyl group migrates.

  • monodentate ligand

    A ligand that binds to the metal ion via a single donor atom. It occupies one position in the coordination sphere. (Section 23.3)

  • plastic

    A material that can be formed into particular shapes by application of heat and pressure. (Section 12.8)

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • twist boat

    A conformation of cyclohexane that is lower in energy than a boat conformation but higher in energy than a chair conformation.

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