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Solutions for Chapter 6.2: Drawing and Naming Molecules

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780030391071

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Solutions for Chapter 6.2: Drawing and Naming Molecules

Since 13 problems in chapter 6.2: Drawing and Naming Molecules have been answered, more than 47318 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006, edition: 1. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780030391071. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 6.2: Drawing and Naming Molecules includes 13 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • [4+2]-cycloaddition

    A pericyclic reaction, also called a Diels-Alder reaction, that takes place between two different p systems, one of which is associated with four atoms while the other is associated with two atoms.

  • amorphous solid

    A solid whose molecular arrangement lacks the regularly repeating long- range pattern of a crystal. (Section 12.2)

  • Anti stereoselectivity

    The addition of atoms or groups of atoms to opposite faces of a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • band structure

    The electronic structure of a solid, defining the allowed ranges of energy for electrons in a solid. (Section 12.7)

  • boat conformation

    A conformation of cyclohexane in which all bond angles are fairly close to 109.5° and many hydrogen atoms are eclipsing each other.

  • bond order

    The number of bonding electron pairs shared between two atoms, minus the number of antibonding electron pairs: bond order = (number of bonding electrons - number of antibonding electrons)/2. (Section 9.7)

  • breeder reactor.

    A nuclear reactor that produces more fissionable materials than it uses. (19.5)

  • Chiral center

    A tetrahedral atom, most commonly carbon, that is bonded to four different groups; also called a chirality center

  • coupling constant

    When signal splitting occurs in NMR spectroscopy, the distance between the individual peaks of a signal.

  • Dalton’s law of partial pressures.

    The total pressure of a mixture of gases is just the sum of the pressures that each gas would exert if it were present alone. (5.6)

  • law of constant composition

    A law that states that the elemental composition of a pure compound is always the same, regardless of its source; also called the law of definite proportions. (Section 1.2)

  • matter

    Anything that occupies space and has mass; the physical material of the universe. (Section 1.1)

  • Merrifield synthesis

    A method for building a peptide from protected building blocks.

  • metallic character

    The extent to which an element exhibits the physical and chemical properties characteristic of metals, for example, luster, malleability, ductility, and good thermal and electrical conductivity. (Section 7.6)

  • Oligosaccharide

    A carbohydrate containing four to ten monosaccharide units, each joined to the next by a glycosidic bond.

  • ortho

    On an aromatic ring, the C2 position.

  • reducing agent

    A compound that reduces another compound and in the process is itself oxidized. Sodium borohydride and lithium aluminum hydride are reducing agents.

  • Stereocenter

    An atom, most commonly carbon, about which exchange of two groups produces a stereoisomer. Chiral centers are one type of stereocenter

  • Steroid

    A plant or animal lipid having the characteristic tetracyclic ring structure of the steroid nucleus, namely three sixmembered rings and one fi ve-membered ring.

  • weak deactivators

    Groups that weakly deactivate an aromatic ring toward electrophilic aromatic substitution, thereby decreasing the rate of the reaction.

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