Solutions for Chapter 3: Standards-Based Assessment

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780547586632

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Solutions for Chapter 3: Standards-Based Assessment

Solutions for Chapter 3
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Textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012
Edition: 1
Author: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis
ISBN: 9780547586632

Since 54 problems in chapter 3: Standards-Based Assessment have been answered, more than 23053 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 3: Standards-Based Assessment includes 54 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780547586632. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012, edition: 1.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 1,4-addition

    A reaction involving the addition of two groups to a conjugated p system in which one group is installed at the C1 position and the other group is installed at the C4 position.

  • absolute zero.

    Theoretically the lowest attainable temperature. (5.3)

  • actual yield.

    The amount of product actually obtained in a reaction. (3.10)

  • Anabolic steroid

    A steroid hormone, such as testosterone, that promotes tissue and muscle growth and development

  • Antiaromatic compound

    A monocyclic compound that is planar or nearly so, has one 2p orbital on each atom of the ring, and has 4n p electrons in the cyclic arrangement of overlapping 2p orbitals, where n is an integer. Antiaromatic compounds are especially unstable

  • aryl amine

    An amine in which the nitrogen atom is connected directly to an aromatic ring.

  • carbon black

    A microcrystalline form of carbon. (Section 22.9)

  • cathode rays

    Streams of electrons that are produced when a high voltage is applied to electrodes in an evacuated tube. (Section 2.2)

  • Cation

    An atom or group of atoms bearing a positive charge.

  • chemical formula

    A notation that uses chemical symbols with numerical subscripts to convey the relative proportions of atoms of the different elements in a substance. (Section 2.6)

  • condensation reaction.

    A reaction in which two smaller molecules combine to form a larger molecule. Water is invariably one of the products of such a reaction. (24.4)

  • electrophilic aromatic substitution

    A substitution reaction in which an aromatic proton is replaced by an electrophile and the aromatic moiety is preserved.

  • enantiomer

    A nonsuperimposable mirror image.

  • first law of thermodynamics

    A statement that energy is conserved in any process. One way to express the law is that the change in internal energy, ?E, of a system in any process is equal to the heat, q, added to the system, plus the work, w, done on the system by its surroundings: ?E = q + w. (Section 5.2)

  • heterogeneous catalyst

    A catalyst that is in a different phase from that of the reactant substances. (Section 14.7)

  • Histone

    A protein, particularly rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine, that is found associated with DNA molecules

  • Radical inhibitor

    A compound such as a phenol that selectively reacts with radicals to remove them from a chain reaction and terminate the chain

  • S (Section 3.3

    From the Latin, sinister, left; used in the R,S convention to show that the order of priority of groups on a chiral center is counterclockwise

  • sigma 1S2 bond

    A covalent bond in which electron density is concentrated along the internuclear axis. (Section 9.6)

  • transport protein

    A protein used to transport molecules or ions from one location to another. Hemoglobin is a classic example of a transport protein, used to transport molecular oxygen from the lungs to all the tissues of the body.

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