Solutions for Chapter 19.2: Balancing Redox Equations

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780547586632

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Solutions for Chapter 19.2: Balancing Redox Equations

Chapter 19.2: Balancing Redox Equations includes 4 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012, edition: 1. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780547586632. Since 4 problems in chapter 19.2: Balancing Redox Equations have been answered, more than 22145 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Absorbance (A)

    A quantitative measure of the extent to which a compound absorbs radiation of a particular wavelength. A 5 log (I0/I ) where I0 is the incident radiation and I is the transmitted radiation

  • alkali metals

    Members of group 1A in the periodic table. (Section 7.7)

  • Bimolecular reaction

    A reaction in which two species are involved in the rate-determining step.

  • Brønsted base.

    A substance capable of accepting a proton. (4.3)

  • carbohydrates

    A class of substances formed from polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones. (Section 24.8)

  • chromatogram

    In gas chromatography, a plot that identifies the retention time of each compound in the mixture.

  • diagonal relationship.

    Similarities between pairs of elements in different groups and periods of the periodic table. (8.6)

  • fingerprint region

    The region of an IR spectrum that contains signals resulting from the vibrational excitation of most single bonds (stretching and bending).

  • Freons

    CFCs that were heavily used for a wide variety of commercial applications, including as refrigerants, as propellants, in the production of foam insulation, as fire-fighting materials, and many other useful applications.

  • Messenger RNA (mRNA)

    A ribonucleic acid that carries coded genetic information from DNA to the ribosomes for the synthesis of proteins

  • micelle

    A group of molecules arranged in a sphere such that the surface of the sphere is comprised of polar groups, rendering the micelle water soluble.

  • octet rule

    The observation that second-row elements (C, N, O, and F) will form the necessary number of bonds so as to achieve a full valence shell (eight electrons).

  • Order of precedence of functions

    A ranking of functional groups in order of priority for the purposes of IUPAC nomenclature.

  • photon

    When electromagnetic radiation is viewed as a particle, an individual packet of energy.

  • plasticizers

    Small molecules that are trapped between polymer chains where they function as lubricants, preventing the polymer from being brittle.

  • polymer

    A large molecule of high molecular mass, formed by the joining together, or polymerization, of a large number of molecules of low molecular mass. The individual molecules forming the polymer are called monomers. (Sections 12.1 and 12.8)

  • R (Section 3.3)

    From the Latin, rectus, straight, correct; used in the R,S convention to show that the order of priority of groups on a chiral center is clockwise.

  • radical initiator

    A compound with a weak bond that undergoes homolytic bond cleavage with great ease, producing radicals that can initiate a radical chain process.

  • S

    A term used to designate the configuration of a chirality center, determined in the following way: Each of the four groups is assigned a priority, and the molecule is then rotated (if necessary) so that the #4 group is directed behind the page (on a dash). A counterclockwise sequence for 1-2-3 is designated as S.

  • Woodward-Fieser rules

    Rules for predicting the wavelength of maximum absorption for a compound with extended conjugation.

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