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Organic Chemistry, 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Solutions by Chapter
4 5 0 309 Reviews
Textbook: Organic Chemistry,
Edition: 9
Author: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano
ISBN: 9780073402741

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 375. Since problems from 375 chapters in Organic Chemistry, have been answered, more than 12618 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Organic Chemistry, were answered by Patricia, our top Chemistry solution expert on 03/05/18, 08:00PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Organic Chemistry, was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • absolute zero

    The lowest attainable temperature; 0 K on the Kelvin scale and -273.15 °C on the Celsius scale. (Section 1.4)

  • acceptor impurities.

    Impurities that can accept electrons from semiconductors. (21.3)

  • activate

    For a substituted aromatic ring, the effect of an electron-donating substituent that increases the rate of electrophilic aromatic substitution.

  • acyl group

    The term describing a carbonyl group (CRO bond) connected to an alkyl group or aryl group.

  • alkanes.

    Hydrocarbons having the general formula CnH2n12, where n 5 1,2, . . . . (24.2)

  • alkenes.

    Hydrocarbons that contain one or more carbon-carbon double bonds. They have the general formula CnH2n, where n 5 2,3, . . . . (24.2)

  • cell potential

    The potential difference between the cathode and anode in an electrochemical cell; it is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called electromotive force. (Section 20.4)

  • Chemical shift (d)

    The shift in parts per million of an NMR signal relative to the signal of TMS

  • cycloalkanes.

    Alkanes whose carbon atoms are joined in rings. (24.2)

  • deshielded

    In NMR spectroscopy,protons or carbon atoms whose surrounding electron density is poor.

  • d–d transition

    The transition of an electron in a transition-metal compound from a lower-energy d orbital to a higher-energy d orbital. (Section 23.6)

  • enol

    A compound containing a hydroxyl group (OH) connected directly to a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • insulators

    Materials that do not conduct electricity. (Section 12.7)

  • Ligand

    A Lewis base bonded to a metal atom in a coordination compound. It may bond strongly or weakly.

  • Living polymer

    A polymer chain that continues to grow without chain-termination steps until either all of the monomer is consumed or some external agent is added to terminate the chain. The polymer chains will continue to grow if more monomer is added.

  • pericylic reactions

    Reactions that occur via a concerted process and do not involve either ionic or radical intermediates.

  • physical changes

    Changes (such as a phase change) that occur with no change in chemical composition. (Section 1.3)

  • scientific method

    The general process of advancing scientific knowledge by making experimental observations and by formulating hypotheses, theories, and laws. (Section 1.3)

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • triglyceride

    A triester formed from glycerol and three long-chain carboxylic acids.

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