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Textbooks / Chemistry / Organic Chemistry 2

Organic Chemistry 2nd Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Organic Chemistry | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781118454312 | Authors: David R. Klein

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781118454312

Organic Chemistry | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781118454312 | Authors: David R. Klein

Organic Chemistry | 2nd Edition - Solutions by Chapter

The full step-by-step solution to problem in Organic Chemistry were answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 09/04/17, 09:39PM. Since problems from 27 chapters in Organic Chemistry have been answered, more than 283939 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 27. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781118454312. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 2.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • anode.

    The electrode at which oxidation occurs. (18.2)

  • anti-periplanar

    A conformation in which a hydrogen atom and a leaving group are separated by a dihedral angle of approximately 180°.

  • base

    A substance that is an H+ acceptor; a base produces an excess of OH-1aq2 ions when it dissolves in water. (Section 4.3)

  • block copolymer

    A copolymer in which the different homopolymer subunits are connected together in one chain.

  • buffer solution.

    A solution of (a) a weak acid or base and (b) its salt; both components must be present. The solution has the ability to resist changes in pH upon the addition of small amounts of either acid or base. (16.3)

  • common-ion effect

    A shift of an equilibrium induced by an ion common to the equilibrium. For example, added Na2SO4 decreases the solubility of the slightly soluble salt BaSO4, or added NaF decreases the percent ionization of HF. (Section 17.1)

  • Dehydrohalogenation

    Removal of !H and !X from adjacent carbons; a type of b-elimination

  • heterolytic bond cleavage

    Bond breaking that results in the formation of ions.

  • hydration

    A reaction in which a proton and a hydroxyl group (OH) are added across a p bond.

  • Kinetic control

    Experimental conditions under which the composition of the product mixture is determined by the relative rates of formation of each product.

  • meta director

    An electronwithdrawing group that directs the regiochemistry of an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction such that the incoming electrophile is installed at the meta position.

  • metalloids

    Elements that lie along the diagonal line separating the metals from the nonmetals in the periodic table; the properties of metalloids are intermediate between those of metals and nonmetals. (Section 2.5)

  • mineral

    A solid, inorganic substance occurring in nature, such as calcium carbonate, which occurs as calcite. (Section 23.1)

  • oxyacid

    A compound in which one or more OH groups, and possibly additional oxygen atoms, are bonded to a central atom. (Section 16.10)

  • phase diagram

    A graphic representation of the equilibria among the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of a substance as a function of temperature and pressure. (Section 11.6)

  • Phenyl group

    A group derived by removing an H from benzene; abbreviated C6H5! or Ph!.

  • polycarbonates

    Polymers that are similar in structure to polyesters but with repeating carbonate groups (!O!CO2!) instead of repeating ester groups (!CO2!). polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  • rate constant

    A constant of proportionality between the reaction rate and the concentrations of reactants that appear in the rate law. (Section 14.3)

  • Resonance in NMR spectroscopy

    The absorption of electromagnetic radiation by a precessing nucleus and the resulting “fl ip” of its nuclear spin from the lower energy state to the higher energy state.

  • Wohl degradation

    A process that involves the removal of a carbon atom from an aldose. The aldehyde group is first converted to a cyanohydrin, followed by loss of HCN in the presence of a base.