×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Textbooks / Math / College Algebra 9

College Algebra 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

College Algebra | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9781133963028 | Authors: Ron Larson

Full solutions for College Algebra | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9781133963028

College Algebra | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9781133963028 | Authors: Ron Larson

College Algebra | 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

The full step-by-step solution to problem in College Algebra were answered by , our top Math solution expert on 01/02/18, 09:21PM. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 9. Since problems from 9 chapters in College Algebra have been answered, more than 97433 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: College Algebra, edition: 9. College Algebra was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781133963028.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Back substitution.

    Upper triangular systems are solved in reverse order Xn to Xl.

  • Cofactor Cij.

    Remove row i and column j; multiply the determinant by (-I)i + j •

  • Distributive Law

    A(B + C) = AB + AC. Add then multiply, or mUltiply then add.

  • Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

    A factorization of the Fourier matrix Fn into e = log2 n matrices Si times a permutation. Each Si needs only nl2 multiplications, so Fnx and Fn-1c can be computed with ne/2 multiplications. Revolutionary.

  • Fibonacci numbers

    0,1,1,2,3,5, ... satisfy Fn = Fn-l + Fn- 2 = (A7 -A~)I()q -A2). Growth rate Al = (1 + .J5) 12 is the largest eigenvalue of the Fibonacci matrix [ } A].

  • Gauss-Jordan method.

    Invert A by row operations on [A I] to reach [I A-I].

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Hessenberg matrix H.

    Triangular matrix with one extra nonzero adjacent diagonal.

  • Linear transformation T.

    Each vector V in the input space transforms to T (v) in the output space, and linearity requires T(cv + dw) = c T(v) + d T(w). Examples: Matrix multiplication A v, differentiation and integration in function space.

  • Normal equation AT Ax = ATb.

    Gives the least squares solution to Ax = b if A has full rank n (independent columns). The equation says that (columns of A)·(b - Ax) = o.

  • Nullspace N (A)

    = All solutions to Ax = O. Dimension n - r = (# columns) - rank.

  • Pivot columns of A.

    Columns that contain pivots after row reduction. These are not combinations of earlier columns. The pivot columns are a basis for the column space.

  • Positive definite matrix A.

    Symmetric matrix with positive eigenvalues and positive pivots. Definition: x T Ax > 0 unless x = O. Then A = LDLT with diag(D» O.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.

  • Special solutions to As = O.

    One free variable is Si = 1, other free variables = o.

  • Spectrum of A = the set of eigenvalues {A I, ... , An}.

    Spectral radius = max of IAi I.

  • Subspace S of V.

    Any vector space inside V, including V and Z = {zero vector only}.

  • Triangle inequality II u + v II < II u II + II v II.

    For matrix norms II A + B II < II A II + II B II·

  • Vector space V.

    Set of vectors such that all combinations cv + d w remain within V. Eight required rules are given in Section 3.1 for scalars c, d and vectors v, w.