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Solutions for Chapter 1.3: Heat Equation

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Full solutions for Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780321797056

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Solutions for Chapter 1.3: Heat Equation

Solutions for Chapter 1.3
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Chapter 1.3: Heat Equation includes 3 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321797056. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems, edition: 5. Since 3 problems in chapter 1.3: Heat Equation have been answered, more than 8678 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Cofactor Cij.

    Remove row i and column j; multiply the determinant by (-I)i + j •

  • Conjugate Gradient Method.

    A sequence of steps (end of Chapter 9) to solve positive definite Ax = b by minimizing !x T Ax - x Tb over growing Krylov subspaces.

  • Eigenvalue A and eigenvector x.

    Ax = AX with x#-O so det(A - AI) = o.

  • Factorization

    A = L U. If elimination takes A to U without row exchanges, then the lower triangular L with multipliers eij (and eii = 1) brings U back to A.

  • Full column rank r = n.

    Independent columns, N(A) = {O}, no free variables.

  • Fundamental Theorem.

    The nullspace N (A) and row space C (AT) are orthogonal complements in Rn(perpendicular from Ax = 0 with dimensions rand n - r). Applied to AT, the column space C(A) is the orthogonal complement of N(AT) in Rm.

  • Jordan form 1 = M- 1 AM.

    If A has s independent eigenvectors, its "generalized" eigenvector matrix M gives 1 = diag(lt, ... , 1s). The block his Akh +Nk where Nk has 1 's on diagonall. Each block has one eigenvalue Ak and one eigenvector.

  • Kirchhoff's Laws.

    Current Law: net current (in minus out) is zero at each node. Voltage Law: Potential differences (voltage drops) add to zero around any closed loop.

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Multiplier eij.

    The pivot row j is multiplied by eij and subtracted from row i to eliminate the i, j entry: eij = (entry to eliminate) / (jth pivot).

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Norm

    IIA II. The ".e 2 norm" of A is the maximum ratio II Ax II/l1x II = O"max· Then II Ax II < IIAllllxll and IIABII < IIAIIIIBII and IIA + BII < IIAII + IIBII. Frobenius norm IIAII} = L La~. The.e 1 and.e oo norms are largest column and row sums of laij I.

  • Outer product uv T

    = column times row = rank one matrix.

  • Plane (or hyperplane) in Rn.

    Vectors x with aT x = O. Plane is perpendicular to a =1= O.

  • Polar decomposition A = Q H.

    Orthogonal Q times positive (semi)definite H.

  • Projection p = a(aTblaTa) onto the line through a.

    P = aaT laTa has rank l.

  • Random matrix rand(n) or randn(n).

    MATLAB creates a matrix with random entries, uniformly distributed on [0 1] for rand and standard normal distribution for randn.

  • Row space C (AT) = all combinations of rows of A.

    Column vectors by convention.

  • Singular matrix A.

    A square matrix that has no inverse: det(A) = o.

  • Singular Value Decomposition

    (SVD) A = U:E VT = (orthogonal) ( diag)( orthogonal) First r columns of U and V are orthonormal bases of C (A) and C (AT), AVi = O'iUi with singular value O'i > O. Last columns are orthonormal bases of nullspaces.

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