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Textbooks / Statistics / Mathematical Statistics with Applications 8

Mathematical Statistics with Applications 8th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321807090 | Authors: Irwin Miller

Full solutions for Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780321807090

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321807090 | Authors: Irwin Miller

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Since problems from 15 chapters in Mathematical Statistics with Applications have been answered, more than 1029 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 15. Mathematical Statistics with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321807090. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Mathematical Statistics with Applications were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 09/27/17, 04:55PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications, edition: 8.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • Additivity property of x 2

    If two independent random variables X1 and X2 are distributed as chi-square with v1 and v2 degrees of freedom, respectively, Y = + X X 1 2 is a chi-square random variable with u = + v v 1 2 degrees of freedom. This generalizes to any number of independent chi-square random variables.

  • Alias

    In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Attribute

    A qualitative characteristic of an item or unit, usually arising in quality control. For example, classifying production units as defective or nondefective results in attributes data.

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Average run length, or ARL

    The average number of samples taken in a process monitoring or inspection scheme until the scheme signals that the process is operating at a level different from the level in which it began.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Cause-and-effect diagram

    A chart used to organize the various potential causes of a problem. Also called a ishbone diagram.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Contour plot

    A two-dimensional graphic used for a bivariate probability density function that displays curves for which the probability density function is constant.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • Experiment

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model