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Statistics Through Applications 2nd Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781429219747 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes

Full solutions for Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781429219747

Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781429219747 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes

Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition - Solutions by Chapter

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 10. Since problems from 10 chapters in Statistics Through Applications have been answered, more than 7018 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Statistics Through Applications were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 11/10/17, 06:04PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics Through Applications, edition: 2. Statistics Through Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781429219747.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Attribute

    A qualitative characteristic of an item or unit, usually arising in quality control. For example, classifying production units as defective or nondefective results in attributes data.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Cause-and-effect diagram

    A chart used to organize the various potential causes of a problem. Also called a ishbone diagram.

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Consistent estimator

    An estimator that converges in probability to the true value of the estimated parameter as the sample size increases.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Covariance

    A measure of association between two random variables obtained as the expected value of the product of the two random variables around their means; that is, Cov(X Y, ) [( )( )] =? ? E X Y ? ? X Y .

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Defect concentration diagram

    A quality tool that graphically shows the location of defects on a part or in a process.

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

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