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Textbooks / Statistics / Statistics Through Applications 2

Statistics Through Applications 2nd Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781429219747 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes

Full solutions for Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781429219747

Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781429219747 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes

Statistics Through Applications | 2nd Edition - Solutions by Chapter

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 10. Since problems from 10 chapters in Statistics Through Applications have been answered, more than 58823 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Statistics Through Applications were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 11/10/17, 06:04PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics Through Applications, edition: 2. Statistics Through Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781429219747.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Block

    In experimental design, a group of experimental units or material that is relatively homogeneous. The purpose of dividing experimental units into blocks is to produce an experimental design wherein variability within blocks is smaller than variability between blocks. This allows the factors of interest to be compared in an environment that has less variability than in an unblocked experiment.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Conditional variance.

    The variance of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Defect

    Used in statistical quality control, a defect is a particular type of nonconformance to speciications or requirements. Sometimes defects are classiied into types, such as appearance defects and functional defects.

  • Defects-per-unit control chart

    See U chart

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.