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Solutions for Chapter 3.4: Measures of Relative Standing and Boxplots

Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321836960 | Authors: Mario F. Triola

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321836960

Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321836960 | Authors: Mario F. Triola

Solutions for Chapter 3.4: Measures of Relative Standing and Boxplots

Solutions for Chapter 3.4
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Textbook: Elementary Statistics
Edition: 12
Author: Mario F. Triola
ISBN: 9780321836960

Summary of Chapter 3.4: Measures of Relative Standing and Boxplots

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Elementary Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321836960. Chapter 3.4: Measures of Relative Standing and Boxplots includes 65 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics, edition: 12. Since 65 problems in chapter 3.4: Measures of Relative Standing and Boxplots have been answered, more than 536265 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Average run length, or ARL

    The average number of samples taken in a process monitoring or inspection scheme until the scheme signals that the process is operating at a level different from the level in which it began.

  • Chi-square test

    Any test of signiicance based on the chi-square distribution. The most common chi-square tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variance or standard deviation of a normal distribution and (2) testing goodness of it of a theoretical distribution to sample data

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Continuous random variable.

    A random variable with an interval (either inite or ininite) of real numbers for its range.

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Cumulative distribution function

    For a random variable X, the function of X deined as PX x ( ) ? that is used to specify the probability distribution.

  • Deming

    W. Edwards Deming (1900–1993) was a leader in the use of statistical quality control.

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

  • Gamma random variable

    A random variable that generalizes an Erlang random variable to noninteger values of the parameter r

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications