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Solutions for Chapter 4.3: Elementary Statistics 12th Edition

Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321836960 | Authors: Mario F. Triola

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321836960

Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321836960 | Authors: Mario F. Triola

Solutions for Chapter 4.3

Solutions for Chapter 4.3
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Textbook: Elementary Statistics
Edition: 12
Author: Mario F. Triola
ISBN: 9780321836960

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 43 problems in chapter 4.3 have been answered, more than 233703 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Elementary Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321836960. Chapter 4.3 includes 43 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics, edition: 12.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Cause-and-effect diagram

    A chart used to organize the various potential causes of a problem. Also called a ishbone diagram.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Conditional probability mass function

    The probability mass function of the conditional probability distribution of a discrete random variable.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Cumulative distribution function

    For a random variable X, the function of X deined as PX x ( ) ? that is used to specify the probability distribution.

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications