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Solutions for Chapter 10.4: Conditioning on Random Variables

Fundamentals of Probability, with Stochastic Processes | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780131453401 | Authors: Saeed Ghahramani

Full solutions for Fundamentals of Probability, with Stochastic Processes | 3rd Edition

ISBN: 9780131453401

Fundamentals of Probability, with Stochastic Processes | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780131453401 | Authors: Saeed Ghahramani

Solutions for Chapter 10.4: Conditioning on Random Variables

Solutions for Chapter 10.4
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Textbook: Fundamentals of Probability, with Stochastic Processes
Edition: 3
Author: Saeed Ghahramani
ISBN: 9780131453401

Since 21 problems in chapter 10.4: Conditioning on Random Variables have been answered, more than 15025 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 10.4: Conditioning on Random Variables includes 21 full step-by-step solutions. Fundamentals of Probability, with Stochastic Processes was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780131453401. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Fundamentals of Probability, with Stochastic Processes, edition: 3.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Adjusted R 2

    A variation of the R 2 statistic that compensates for the number of parameters in a regression model. Essentially, the adjustment is a penalty for increasing the number of parameters in the model. Alias. In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conditional probability density function

    The probability density function of the conditional probability distribution of a continuous random variable.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Defects-per-unit control chart

    See U chart

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

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