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Textbooks / Statistics / Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers 5

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers 5th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780470053041 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger

Full solutions for Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780470053041

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780470053041 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 5th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 14. Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470053041. Since problems from 14 chapters in Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers have been answered, more than 90525 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 01/18/18, 04:18PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers, edition: 5.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Bayes’ estimator

    An estimator for a parameter obtained from a Bayesian method that uses a prior distribution for the parameter along with the conditional distribution of the data given the parameter to obtain the posterior distribution of the parameter. The estimator is obtained from the posterior distribution.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Conditional variance.

    The variance of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .