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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 18: Nonparametric Methods: Analysis of Ranked Data

Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401805 | Authors: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen

Full solutions for Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition

ISBN: 9780073401805

Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401805 | Authors: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 18: Nonparametric Methods: Analysis of Ranked Data

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 18
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Textbook: Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics
Edition: 15
Author: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen
ISBN: 9780073401805

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics, edition: 15. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter Chapter 18: Nonparametric Methods: Analysis of Ranked Data includes 43 full step-by-step solutions. Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073401805. Since 43 problems in chapter Chapter 18: Nonparametric Methods: Analysis of Ranked Data have been answered, more than 24357 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alias

    In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Central composite design (CCD)

    A second-order response surface design in k variables consisting of a two-level factorial, 2k axial runs, and one or more center points. The two-level factorial portion of a CCD can be a fractional factorial design when k is large. The CCD is the most widely used design for itting a second-order model.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Crossed factors

    Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Exhaustive

    A property of a collection of events that indicates that their union equals the sample space.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Goodness of fit

    In general, the agreement of a set of observed values and a set of theoretical values that depend on some hypothesis. The term is often used in itting a theoretical distribution to a set of observations.

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