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Tips, take 2. In another experiment to see if getting candy after a meal would induce

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux ISBN: 9780321854018 481

Solution for problem 24 Chapter Part III

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

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Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

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Problem 24

Tips, take 2. In another experiment to see if getting candy after a meal would induce customers to leave a bigger tip, a waitress randomly decided what to do with 80 dining parties. Some parties received no candy, some just one piece, and some two pieces. Others initially got just one piece of candy, and then the waitress suggested that they take another piece. She recorded the tips received, finding that, in general, the more candy, the higher the tip, but the highest tips (23%) came from the parties who got one piece and then were offered more. (Source: Sweetening the Till: The Use of Candy to Increase Restaurant Tipping. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 32, no. 2 [2002]: 300309) a) Diagram this experiment. b) How many factors are there? How many levels? c) How many treatments are there? d) What is the response variable? e) Did this experiment involve blinding? Double-blinding? f) In what way might the waitress, perhaps unintentionally, have biased the results?

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STAT 2004 CHAPTER ONE: WEEK 4 SAMPLE STATISTICS n 2 1 2  Sample variance- s = n−1 i=1x ix´)  Sample standard deviation- Tells you how spread out your data is. It is the square root of the variance. QUANTILES  Also known as percentiles. o If you are in the 70 percentile, you are better than 70% of your class and not as good as 30%. DISTRIBUTION  Describes shape, center, and spread/variation of data. For the images below, imagine histograms that fit the depicted curves. BOXPLOT  A boxplot uses a five number summary consisting of the median (Q ), 2

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Chapter Part III, Problem 24 is Solved
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Textbook: Stats Modeling the World
Edition: 4
Author: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux
ISBN: 9780321854018

Stats Modeling the World was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321854018. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Stats Modeling the World, edition: 4. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 31 chapters, and 1357 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 24 from chapter: Part III was answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 03/16/18, 04:57PM. The answer to “Tips, take 2. In another experiment to see if getting candy after a meal would induce customers to leave a bigger tip, a waitress randomly decided what to do with 80 dining parties. Some parties received no candy, some just one piece, and some two pieces. Others initially got just one piece of candy, and then the waitress suggested that they take another piece. She recorded the tips received, finding that, in general, the more candy, the higher the tip, but the highest tips (23%) came from the parties who got one piece and then were offered more. (Source: Sweetening the Till: The Use of Candy to Increase Restaurant Tipping. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 32, no. 2 [2002]: 300309) a) Diagram this experiment. b) How many factors are there? How many levels? c) How many treatments are there? d) What is the response variable? e) Did this experiment involve blinding? Double-blinding? f) In what way might the waitress, perhaps unintentionally, have biased the results?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 165 words. Since the solution to 24 from Part III chapter was answered, more than 235 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer.

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Tips, take 2. In another experiment to see if getting candy after a meal would induce