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BIO Bone Fractures. The maximum energy that a bone can

University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman ISBN: 9780321675460 31

Solution for problem 10E Chapter 7

University Physics | 13th Edition

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University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman

University Physics | 13th Edition

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Problem 10E

BIO Bone Fractures. The maximum energy that a bone can absorb without breaking depends on characteristics such as its cross-sectional area and elasticity. For healthy human leg bones of approximately 6.0 cm2 cross-sectional area, this energy has been experimentally measured to be about 200 J. (a) From approximately what maximum height could a 60-kg person jump and land rigidly upright on both feet without breaking his legs? (b) You are probably surprised at how small the answer to part (a) is. People obviously jump from much greater heights without breaking their legs. How can that be? What else absorbs the energy when they jump from greater heights? (?Hint:? How did the person in part (a) land? How do people normally land when they jump from greater heights?) (c) Why might older people be much more prone than younger ones to bone fractures from simple falls (such as a fall in the shower)?

Step-by-Step Solution:

Solution 10E Step 1: Data given Mass m = 60 kg Area of cross section A = 6.0 cm 2 Energy W = 200 J W = KE = PE = mgh 200J × 2 = 400 J 400 J is the energy used for both legs 400 J = mgh 400 J = 60 kg × 9.8 m/s × h 400 J h = 60 kg ×9.8 m/s h = 0.680 m From this we can note that the person has to jump from 0.680 m to stand upright without breaking any bone Step 2 : When a person jumps he bends his knees and his entire body will move downwards and body inclines towards the ground , this causes impulse and the momentum changes which reduces amount of force and increases elasticity of the person

Step 3 of 3

Chapter 7, Problem 10E is Solved
Textbook: University Physics
Edition: 13
Author: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman
ISBN: 9780321675460

This full solution covers the following key subjects: jump, breaking, Greater, heights, Energy. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 26 chapters, and 2929 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 10E from chapter: 7 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 05/06/17, 06:07PM. The answer to “BIO Bone Fractures. The maximum energy that a bone can absorb without breaking depends on characteristics such as its cross-sectional area and elasticity. For healthy human leg bones of approximately 6.0 cm2 cross-sectional area, this energy has been experimentally measured to be about 200 J. (a) From approximately what maximum height could a 60-kg person jump and land rigidly upright on both feet without breaking his legs? (b) You are probably surprised at how small the answer to part (a) is. People obviously jump from much greater heights without breaking their legs. How can that be? What else absorbs the energy when they jump from greater heights? (?Hint:? How did the person in part (a) land? How do people normally land when they jump from greater heights?) (c) Why might older people be much more prone than younger ones to bone fractures from simple falls (such as a fall in the shower)?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 152 words. University Physics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321675460. Since the solution to 10E from 7 chapter was answered, more than 1726 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: University Physics, edition: 13.

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