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Internal injuries in vehicular accidents may be due to

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780130606204 | Authors: Douglas C. Giancoli ISBN: 9780130606204 3

Solution for problem 8CQ Chapter 4

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition

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Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780130606204 | Authors: Douglas C. Giancoli

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition

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Problem 8CQ

Internal injuries in vehicular accidents may be due to what is called the “third collision.” The first collision is the vehicle hitting the external object. The second collision is the person hitting something on the inside of the car, such as the dashboard or windshield. This may cause external lacerations. The third collision, possibly the most damaging to the body, is when organs, such as the heart or brain, hit the ribcage, skull, or other confines of the body, bruising the tissues on the leading edge and tearing the organ from its supporting structures on the trailing edge. a. Why is there a third collision? In other words, why are the organs still moving after the second collision? b. If the vehicle was traveling at 60 mph before the first collision, would the organs be traveling faster than, equal to, or slower than 60 mph just before the third collision?

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Solution: a. Why is there a third collision In other words, why are the organs still moving. The second collision is the “human collision.” At the moment of impact, passengers in the car that are unrestrained are still travelling at the vehicle’s original speed. When the car comes to a complete stop the passengers continue to be hurled forward until they come in contact with some part of the automobile. For example, the steering wheel, the dashboard, the front windshield or the back of the front seat. Humans in a crash can also cause serious injuries to other humans when they collide with each other. People in the front seat of a car are often hit by rear-seat passengers as they fly forward with incredible force. Look at it like this. If you are traveling down the road at 65 mph and suddenly need to apply the brakes, any loose objects will continue to move at 65 mph. Even a relatively small object such as a pen or a cell phone traveling at that speed could cause severe...

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Chapter 4, Problem 8CQ is Solved
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Textbook: Physics: Principles with Applications
Edition: 6
Author: Douglas C. Giancoli
ISBN: 9780130606204

Since the solution to 8CQ from 4 chapter was answered, more than 599 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 8CQ from chapter: 4 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 03/03/17, 03:53PM. This full solution covers the following key subjects: collision, organs, other, vehicle, traveling. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 35 chapters, and 3914 solutions. Physics: Principles with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780130606204. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Physics: Principles with Applications, edition: 6. The answer to “Internal injuries in vehicular accidents may be due to what is called the “third collision.” The first collision is the vehicle hitting the external object. The second collision is the person hitting something on the inside of the car, such as the dashboard or windshield. This may cause external lacerations. The third collision, possibly the most damaging to the body, is when organs, such as the heart or brain, hit the ribcage, skull, or other confines of the body, bruising the tissues on the leading edge and tearing the organ from its supporting structures on the trailing edge. a. Why is there a third collision? In other words, why are the organs still moving after the second collision? b. If the vehicle was traveling at 60 mph before the first collision, would the organs be traveling faster than, equal to, or slower than 60 mph just before the third collision?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 150 words.

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