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Textbooks / Chemistry / Chemistry: Matter & Change 1

Chemistry: Matter & Change 1st Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Chemistry: Matter & Change | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780078746376 | Authors: McGraw-Hill Education

Full solutions for Chemistry: Matter & Change | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780078746376

Chemistry: Matter & Change | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780078746376 | Authors: McGraw-Hill Education

Chemistry: Matter & Change | 1st Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Since problems from 24 chapters in Chemistry: Matter & Change have been answered, more than 248257 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. Chemistry: Matter & Change was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780078746376. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: Matter & Change, edition: 1. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 24. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Chemistry: Matter & Change were answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 11/10/17, 05:56PM.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • amine

    Compounds containing a nitrogen atom that is connected to one, two, or three alkyl or aryl groups.

  • boat conformation

    A conformation of cyclohexane in which all bond angles are fairly close to 109.5° and many hydrogen atoms are eclipsing each other.

  • boiling point.

    The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the external atmospheric pressure. (11.8)

  • chelate effect

    The generally larger formation constants for polydentate ligands as compared with the corresponding monodentate ligands. (Section 23.3)

  • chemical equation.

    An equation that uses chemical symbols to show what happens during a chemical reaction. (3.7)

  • concentration

    The quantity of solute present in a given quantity of solvent or solution. (Section 4.5)

  • E

    For alkenes, a stereodescriptorthat indicates that the two priority groups are on opposite sides of the p bond.

  • electromotive force (emf)

    A measure of the driving force, or electrical pressure, for the completion of an electrochemical reaction. Electromotive force is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called the cell potential. (Section 20.4)

  • heat of combustion

    The heat given off during a reaction in which an alkane reacts with oxygen to produce CO2 and water.

  • Hydrogenolysis

    Cleavage of a single bond by H2, most commonly accomplished by treating a compound with H2 in the presence of a transition metal catalyst.

  • internal alkyne

    A compound with the structure R!C#C!R, where each R group is not a hydrogen atom.

  • inversion of configuration

    During a reaction, when the configuration of a chirality center is changed.

  • molecular hydrides

    Compounds formed when hydrogen reacts with nonmetals and metalloids. (Section 22.2)

  • Nonpolar covalent bond

    A covalent bond between atoms whose difference in electronegativity is less than approximately 0.5.

  • Nucleophile

    From the Greek meaning nucleus-loving. Any species that can donate a pair of electrons to form a new covalent bond; alternatively, a Lewis base

  • orbital

    An allowed energy state of an electron in the quantum mechanical model of the atom; the term orbital is also used to describe the spatial distribution of the electron. An orbital is defined by the values of three quantum numbers: n, l, and ml (Section 6.5)

  • proteins

    Polypeptide chains comprised of more than 40 or 50 amino acids.

  • reactant

    A starting substance in a chemical reaction; it appears to the left of the arrow in a chemical equation. (Section 3.1)

  • Thiol

    A compound containing an !SH (sulfhydryl) group bonded to an sp3 -hybridized carbon.

  • weak activators

    Groups that weakly activate an aromatic ring toward electrophilic aromatic substitution, thereby enhancing the rate of the reaction.