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Solutions for Chapter 27: General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications 10th Edition

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780132064521 | Authors: Ralph Petrucci

Full solutions for General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition

ISBN: 9780132064521

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780132064521 | Authors: Ralph Petrucci

Solutions for Chapter 27

Solutions for Chapter 27
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Textbook: General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications
Edition: 10
Author: Ralph Petrucci
ISBN: 9780132064521

Chapter 27 includes 86 full step-by-step solutions. Since 86 problems in chapter 27 have been answered, more than 43866 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780132064521. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications, edition: 10.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Betaine

    A neutral molecule with nonadjacent positive and negative charges. An example of a betaine is the intermediate formed by addition of a Wittig reagent to an aldehyde or ketone

  • Born-Haber cycle.

    The cycle that relates lattice energies of ionic compounds to ionization energies, electron affinities, heats of sublimation and formation, and bond enthalpies. (9.3)

  • cathodic protection

    A means of protecting a metal against corrosion by making it the cathode in a voltaic cell. This can be achieved by attaching a more easily oxidized metal, which serves as an anode, to the metal to be protected. (Section 20.8)

  • chemistry

    The scientific discipline that studies the composition, properties, and transformations of matter. (Chapter 1: Introduction)

  • chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)

    Compound containing only carbon, chlorine, and fluorine.

  • crystal field splitting (D).

    The energy difference between two sets of d orbitals in a metal atom when ligands are present. (23.5)

  • Deactivating group

    Any substituent on a benzene ring that causes the rate of electrophilic aromatic substitution to be lower than that for benzene.

  • dilution

    The process of preparing a less concentrated solution from a more concentrated one by adding solvent. (Section 4.5)

  • electromotive force (emf)

    A measure of the driving force, or electrical pressure, for the completion of an electrochemical reaction. Electromotive force is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called the cell potential. (Section 20.4)

  • extensive property

    A property that depends on the amount of material considered; for example, mass or volume. (Section 1.3)

  • glass transition temperature (Tg)

    The temperature at which noncrystalline polymers become very soft.

  • Haworth projection

    For substituted cycloalkanes, a drawing style used to clearly identify which groups are above the ring and which groups are below the ring. (See also Sect. 4.14.)

  • hydrophobic

    Water repelling. The term is often used to describe a type of colloid. (Section 13.6)

  • Levorotatory

    Refers to a substance that rotates the plane of polarized light to the left.

  • mercurinium ion

    The intermediateformed during oxymercuration.

  • osmosis

    The net movement of solvent through a semipermeable membrane toward the solution with greater solute concentration. (Section 13.5)

  • Oxidation

    The loss of electrons. Alternatively, either the loss of hydrogens, the gain of oxygens, or both.

  • primary structure

    The sequence of amino acids along a protein chain. (Section 24.7)

  • sulfonate ions

    Common leaving groups. Examples include tosylate, mesylate, and triflate ions.

  • Vibrational infrared region

    A common type of spin-spin coupling involving the H atoms on two C atoms that are bonded to each other.

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