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Solutions for Chapter 7.6: The CahnIngoldPrelog RS Notational System

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 7.6: The CahnIngoldPrelog RS Notational System

Solutions for Chapter 7.6
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Since 2 problems in chapter 7.6: The CahnIngoldPrelog RS Notational System have been answered, more than 28180 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Chapter 7.6: The CahnIngoldPrelog RS Notational System includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Organic Chemistry, was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acid

    A substance that is able to donate a H+ ion (a proton) and, hence, increases the concentration of H+1aq2 when it dissolves in water. (Section 4.3)

  • Acylium ion

    A resonance-stabilized cation with the structure [RC"O]1 or [ArC"O]1. The positive charge is delocalized over both the carbonyl carbon and the carbonyl oxygen.

  • amino acids.

    A compound that contains at least one amino group and at least one carboxyl group. (25.3)

  • atomic mass unit (amu)

    A unit of measure equivalent to 1 g divided by Avogadro’s number.

  • atomic orbital.

    The wave function (?) of an electron in an atom. (7.5)

  • barometer

    An instrument that measures atmospheric pressure. (5.2)

  • catalyst.

    A substance that increases the rate of a chemical reaction without itself being consumed. (13.6)

  • colligative property

    A property of a solvent (vapor-pressure lowering, freezing-point lowering, boiling-point elevation, osmotic pressure) that depends on the total concentration of solute particles present. (Section 13.5)

  • crystal-field theory

    A theory that accounts for the colors and the magnetic and other properties of transition-metal complexes in terms of the splitting of the energies of metal ion d orbitals by the electrostatic interaction with the ligands. (Section 23.6)

  • debye (D)

    A unit of measure fordipole moments, where 1 debye = 10-18 esu×cm.

  • diagnostic region

    The region of an IR spectrum that contains signals that arise from double bonds, triple bonds, and X!H bonds.

  • entropy

    A thermodynamic function associated with the number of different equivalent energy states or spatial arrangements in which a system may be found. It is a thermodynamic state function, which means that once we specify the conditions for a system—that is, the temperature, pressure, and so on—the entropy is defined. (Section 19.2)

  • High-density lipoprotein (HDL)

    Plasma particles, density 1.06–1.21 g/mL, consisting of approximately 33% proteins, 30% cholesterol, 29% phospholipids, and 8% triglycerides.

  • ion-product constant

    For water, Kw is the product of the aquated hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion concentrations: 3H+43OH-4 = Kw = 1.0 * 10-14 at 25 °C. (Section 16.3)

  • Oil

    When used in the context of fats and oils, a mixture of triglycerides that is liquid at room temperature

  • peptide bond

    The amide linkage by which two amino acids are coupled together to form peptides.

  • pyrometallurgy

    A process in which heat converts a mineral in an ore from one chemical form to another and eventually to the free metal. (Section 23.2)

  • salinity

    A measure of the salt content of seawater, brine, or brackish water. It is equal to the mass in grams of dissolved salts present in 1 kg of seawater. (Section 18.3)

  • sp3-hybridized orbitals

    Atomic orbitals that are achieved by mathematically averaging one s orbital with three p orbitals to form four hybridized atomic orbitals.

  • Stereoselective reaction

    A reaction in which one stereoisomer is formed in preference to all others. A stereoselective reaction may be enantioselective or diastereoselective, as the case may be.

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