Solutions for Chapter 21.8: The Gabriel Synthesis of Primary Alkylamines

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 21.8: The Gabriel Synthesis of Primary Alkylamines

Solutions for Chapter 21.8
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This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 21.8: The Gabriel Synthesis of Primary Alkylamines includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Organic Chemistry, was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741. Since 1 problems in chapter 21.8: The Gabriel Synthesis of Primary Alkylamines have been answered, more than 10970 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alkenes

    Hydrocarbons containing one or more carbon–carbon double bonds. (Section 24.2)

  • Alkoxy group

    An !OR group where R is an alkyl group

  • azo dyes

    A class of colored compounds that are formed via azo coupling.

  • basic oxide (basic anhydride)

    An oxide that either reacts with water to form a base or reacts with an acid to form a salt and water. (Section 22.5)

  • chemical kinetics.

    The area of chemistry concerned with the speeds, or rates, at which chemical reactions occur. (13.1)

  • Clemmensen reduction

    Reduction of the C"O group of an aldehyde or ketone to a CH2 group using Zn(Hg) and HCl

  • decomposition reaction.

    The breakdown of a compound into two or more components. (4.4)

  • deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)

    A polynucleotide in which the sugar component is deoxyribose. (Section 24.10)

  • Disaccharide

    A carbohydrate containing two monosaccharide units joined by a glycosidic bond.

  • equilibrium-constant expression

    The expression that describes the relationship among the concentrations (or partial pressures) of the substances present in a system at equilibrium. The numerator is obtained by multiplying the concentrations of the substances on the product side of the equation, each raised to a power equal to its coefficient in the chemical equation. The denominator similarly contains the concentrations of the substances on the reactant side of the equation. (Section 15.2)

  • fibrous proteins

    Proteins that consist of linear chains that are bundled together.

  • first-order reaction

    A reaction in which the reaction rate is proportional to the concentration of a single reactant, raised to the first power. (Section 14.4)

  • fission

    The splitting of a large nucleus into two smaller ones. (Section 21.6)

  • frequency

    The number of times per second that one complete wavelength passes a given point. (Section 6.1)

  • hole

    A vacancy in the valence band of a semiconductor, created by doping. (Section 12.7)

  • hydride shift

    A type of carbocation rearrangement that involves the migration of a hydride ion (H-).

  • S (Section 3.3

    From the Latin, sinister, left; used in the R,S convention to show that the order of priority of groups on a chiral center is counterclockwise

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • solvation

    The clustering of solvent molecules around a solute particle. (Section 13.1)

  • syn-coplanar

    A conformation in which a hydrogen atom and a leaving group are separated by a dihedral angle of exactly 0°.

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