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Textbooks > Chemistry > General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life 4

General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life 4th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321750891 | Authors: Karen C. Timberlake

Full solutions for General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780321750891

General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321750891 | Authors: Karen C. Timberlake

General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life | 4th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 24. Since problems from 24 chapters in General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life have been answered, more than 63349 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life, edition: 4. The full step-by-step solution to problem in General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life were answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 05/06/17, 06:54PM. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321750891.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alkyl group

    A group derived by removing a hydrogen from an alkane; given the symbol R!

  • anomeric carbon

    The C1 position of the cyclic hemiacetal of an aldose or the C2 position of the cyclic hemiacetal of a ketose.

  • biodegradable polymers

    Polymers that can be broken down by enzymes produced by soil microorganisms.

  • catalyst

    A substance that changes the speed of a chemical reaction without itself undergoing a permanent chemical change in the process. (Section 14.7)

  • covalent-network solids

    Solids in which the units that make up the three-dimensional network are joined by covalent bonds. (Section 12.1)

  • Electron affinity

    Energy added or released when an electron is added to an atom or molecule.

  • enantiomer

    A nonsuperimposable mirror image.

  • Enantiotopic groups

    Atoms or groups on an atom that give a chiral center when one of the groups is replaced by another group. A pair of enantiomers results. The hydrogens of the CH2 group of ethanol, for example, are enantiotopic. Replacing one of them by deuterium gives (R)-1-deuteroethanol; replacing the other gives (S)-1-deuteroethanol. Enantiotopic groups have identical chemical shifts in achiral environments but different chemical shifts in chiral environments.

  • Excited state

    A state of a system at higher energy than the ground state.

  • fibers

    Strands of a polymer that are generated when the polymer is heated, forced through small holes, and then cooled.

  • homotopic

    Protons that are interchangeable by rotational symmetry.

  • hydration

    Solvation when the solvent is water. (Section 13.1)

  • Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    A spectroscopic technique that gives information about the number and types of atoms in a molecule, for example, hydrogens (1 H!NMR) and carbons (13C!NMR)

  • oxirane

    A cyclic ether containing a three-membered ring system. Also called an epoxide.

  • precipitation reaction

    A reaction that occurs between substances in solution in which one of the products is insoluble. (Section 4.2)

  • radical initiator

    A compound with a weak bond that undergoes homolytic bond cleavage with great ease, producing radicals that can initiate a radical chain process.

  • Secondary (2°) amine

    An amine in which nitrogen is bonded to two carbons and one hydrogen

  • Strecker synthesis

    A synthetictechnique for preparing racemic a-amino acidsfrom aldehydes.

  • tetravalent

    An element, such as carbon, that forms four bonds.

  • VSEPR theory

    Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion theory, which can be used to predict the geometry around an atom.

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