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Solutions for Chapter Unit 4: Toxins

Full solutions for Living by Chemistry | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781464142314

Solutions for Chapter Unit 4: Toxins

Solutions for Chapter Unit 4
4 5 0 307 Reviews
18
4
Textbook: Living by Chemistry
Edition: 2
Author: Angelica M. Stacy
ISBN: 9781464142314

Living by Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781464142314. Since 20 problems in chapter Unit 4: Toxins have been answered, more than 23383 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Living by Chemistry, edition: 2. Chapter Unit 4: Toxins includes 20 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • accuracy

    A measure of how closely individual measurements agree with the correct value. (Section 1.5)

  • antibonding molecular orbital

    A molecular orbital in which electron density is concentrated outside the region between the two nuclei of bonded atoms. Such orbitals, designated as s* or p*, are less stable (of higher energy) than bonding molecular orbitals. (Section 9.7)

  • Aprotic solvent

    A solvent that cannot serve as a hydrogen-bond donor; nowhere in the molecule is there a hydrogen bonded to an atom of high electronegativity. Common aprotic solvents are dichloromethane, diethyl ether, and dimethyl sulfoxide

  • blocking group

    A group that can be readily installed and uninstalled. Used for regiochemical control during synthesis.

  • Carbohydrate

    A polyhydroxyaldehyde, a polyhydroxyketone, or a substance that gives these compounds on hydrolysis.

  • chelating agent

    A polydentate ligand that is capable of occupying two or more sites in the coordination sphere. (Section 23.3)

  • electrocyclic reaction

    A pericyclic process in which a conjugated polyene undergoes cyclization. In the process, one p bond is converted into a s bond, while the remaining p bonds all change their location. The newly formed s bond joins the ends of the original p system,thereby creating a ring.

  • electron domain

    In the VSEPR model, a region about a central atom in which an electron pair is concentrated. (Section 9.2)

  • enantiomers

    Two mirror-image molecules of a chiral substance. The enantiomers are nonsuperimposable. (Section 23.4)

  • Enolate anion

    An anion derived by loss of a hydrogen from a carbon alpha to a carbonyl group; the anion of an enol.

  • exchange (metathesis) reaction

    A reaction between compounds that when written as a molecular equation appears to involve the exchange of ions between the two reactants. (Section 4.2)

  • galvanic cell

    See voltaic cell. (Section 20.3)

  • Ground state

    The lowest energy state of a system.

  • halogens

    Members of group 7A in the periodic table. (Section 7.8)

  • instantaneous rate

    The reaction rate at a particular time as opposed to the average rate over an interval of time. (Section 14.2)

  • linkage isomers

    Structural isomers of coordination compounds in which a ligand differs in its mode of attachment to a metal ion. (Section 23.4)

  • nematic liquid crystalline phase

    A liquid crystal in which the molecules are aligned in the same general direction, along their long axes, but in which the ends of the molecules are not aligned. (Section 11.7)

  • peptidases

    A variety of enzymes that selectively hydrolyze specific peptide bonds.

  • polymer

    A large molecule of high molecular mass, formed by the joining together, or polymerization, of a large number of molecules of low molecular mass. The individual molecules forming the polymer are called monomers. (Sections 12.1 and 12.8)

  • Zaitsev’s rule

    A rule stating that the major product of a b-elimination reaction is the most stable alkene; that is, it is the alkene with the greatest number of substituents on the carboncarbon double bond

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