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Solutions for Chapter 6.2: Kernel and Range of a Linear Transformation

Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780132296540 | Authors: Bernard Kolman David Hill

Full solutions for Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780132296540

Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780132296540 | Authors: Bernard Kolman David Hill

Solutions for Chapter 6.2: Kernel and Range of a Linear Transformation

Solutions for Chapter 6.2
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Textbook: Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications
Edition: 9
Author: Bernard Kolman David Hill
ISBN: 9780132296540

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications, edition: 9. Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780132296540. Chapter 6.2: Kernel and Range of a Linear Transformation includes 31 full step-by-step solutions. Since 31 problems in chapter 6.2: Kernel and Range of a Linear Transformation have been answered, more than 12008 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Back substitution.

    Upper triangular systems are solved in reverse order Xn to Xl.

  • Complete solution x = x p + Xn to Ax = b.

    (Particular x p) + (x n in nullspace).

  • Complex conjugate

    z = a - ib for any complex number z = a + ib. Then zz = Iz12.

  • Conjugate Gradient Method.

    A sequence of steps (end of Chapter 9) to solve positive definite Ax = b by minimizing !x T Ax - x Tb over growing Krylov subspaces.

  • Determinant IAI = det(A).

    Defined by det I = 1, sign reversal for row exchange, and linearity in each row. Then IAI = 0 when A is singular. Also IABI = IAIIBI and

  • Diagonalization

    A = S-1 AS. A = eigenvalue matrix and S = eigenvector matrix of A. A must have n independent eigenvectors to make S invertible. All Ak = SA k S-I.

  • Eigenvalue A and eigenvector x.

    Ax = AX with x#-O so det(A - AI) = o.

  • Four Fundamental Subspaces C (A), N (A), C (AT), N (AT).

    Use AT for complex A.

  • Fundamental Theorem.

    The nullspace N (A) and row space C (AT) are orthogonal complements in Rn(perpendicular from Ax = 0 with dimensions rand n - r). Applied to AT, the column space C(A) is the orthogonal complement of N(AT) in Rm.

  • Hankel matrix H.

    Constant along each antidiagonal; hij depends on i + j.

  • Hermitian matrix A H = AT = A.

    Complex analog a j i = aU of a symmetric matrix.

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Length II x II.

    Square root of x T x (Pythagoras in n dimensions).

  • Markov matrix M.

    All mij > 0 and each column sum is 1. Largest eigenvalue A = 1. If mij > 0, the columns of Mk approach the steady state eigenvector M s = s > O.

  • Pivot.

    The diagonal entry (first nonzero) at the time when a row is used in elimination.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Row picture of Ax = b.

    Each equation gives a plane in Rn; the planes intersect at x.

  • Singular matrix A.

    A square matrix that has no inverse: det(A) = o.

  • Toeplitz matrix.

    Constant down each diagonal = time-invariant (shift-invariant) filter.

  • Transpose matrix AT.

    Entries AL = Ajj. AT is n by In, AT A is square, symmetric, positive semidefinite. The transposes of AB and A-I are BT AT and (AT)-I.

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