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Solutions for Chapter 7.4: Matrix Norms and Condition Numbers

Full solutions for Linear Algebra with Applications | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780136009290

Solutions for Chapter 7.4: Matrix Norms and Condition Numbers

Solutions for Chapter 7.4
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Textbook: Linear Algebra with Applications
Edition: 8
Author: Steve Leon
ISBN: 9780136009290

Since 47 problems in chapter 7.4: Matrix Norms and Condition Numbers have been answered, more than 17763 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Linear Algebra with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780136009290. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Linear Algebra with Applications, edition: 8. Chapter 7.4: Matrix Norms and Condition Numbers includes 47 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Associative Law (AB)C = A(BC).

    Parentheses can be removed to leave ABC.

  • Conjugate Gradient Method.

    A sequence of steps (end of Chapter 9) to solve positive definite Ax = b by minimizing !x T Ax - x Tb over growing Krylov subspaces.

  • Cramer's Rule for Ax = b.

    B j has b replacing column j of A; x j = det B j I det A

  • Diagonalization

    A = S-1 AS. A = eigenvalue matrix and S = eigenvector matrix of A. A must have n independent eigenvectors to make S invertible. All Ak = SA k S-I.

  • Distributive Law

    A(B + C) = AB + AC. Add then multiply, or mUltiply then add.

  • Echelon matrix U.

    The first nonzero entry (the pivot) in each row comes in a later column than the pivot in the previous row. All zero rows come last.

  • Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

    A factorization of the Fourier matrix Fn into e = log2 n matrices Si times a permutation. Each Si needs only nl2 multiplications, so Fnx and Fn-1c can be computed with ne/2 multiplications. Revolutionary.

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Graph G.

    Set of n nodes connected pairwise by m edges. A complete graph has all n(n - 1)/2 edges between nodes. A tree has only n - 1 edges and no closed loops.

  • Indefinite matrix.

    A symmetric matrix with eigenvalues of both signs (+ and - ).

  • Jordan form 1 = M- 1 AM.

    If A has s independent eigenvectors, its "generalized" eigenvector matrix M gives 1 = diag(lt, ... , 1s). The block his Akh +Nk where Nk has 1 's on diagonall. Each block has one eigenvalue Ak and one eigenvector.

  • Kirchhoff's Laws.

    Current Law: net current (in minus out) is zero at each node. Voltage Law: Potential differences (voltage drops) add to zero around any closed loop.

  • Markov matrix M.

    All mij > 0 and each column sum is 1. Largest eigenvalue A = 1. If mij > 0, the columns of Mk approach the steady state eigenvector M s = s > O.

  • Matrix multiplication AB.

    The i, j entry of AB is (row i of A)ยท(column j of B) = L aikbkj. By columns: Column j of AB = A times column j of B. By rows: row i of A multiplies B. Columns times rows: AB = sum of (column k)(row k). All these equivalent definitions come from the rule that A B times x equals A times B x .

  • Multiplicities AM and G M.

    The algebraic multiplicity A M of A is the number of times A appears as a root of det(A - AI) = O. The geometric multiplicity GM is the number of independent eigenvectors for A (= dimension of the eigenspace).

  • Nullspace N (A)

    = All solutions to Ax = O. Dimension n - r = (# columns) - rank.

  • Particular solution x p.

    Any solution to Ax = b; often x p has free variables = o.

  • Pascal matrix

    Ps = pascal(n) = the symmetric matrix with binomial entries (i1~;2). Ps = PL Pu all contain Pascal's triangle with det = 1 (see Pascal in the index).

  • Pivot.

    The diagonal entry (first nonzero) at the time when a row is used in elimination.

  • Special solutions to As = O.

    One free variable is Si = 1, other free variables = o.