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Solutions for Chapter 3.3: Linear Independence

Full solutions for Linear Algebra with Applications | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780321962218

Solutions for Chapter 3.3: Linear Independence

Solutions for Chapter 3.3
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Textbook: Linear Algebra with Applications
Edition: 9
Author: Steven J. Leon
ISBN: 9780321962218

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Linear Algebra with Applications, edition: 9. Linear Algebra with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321962218. Chapter 3.3: Linear Independence includes 20 full step-by-step solutions. Since 20 problems in chapter 3.3: Linear Independence have been answered, more than 11979 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Affine transformation

    Tv = Av + Vo = linear transformation plus shift.

  • Cofactor Cij.

    Remove row i and column j; multiply the determinant by (-I)i + j •

  • Complete solution x = x p + Xn to Ax = b.

    (Particular x p) + (x n in nullspace).

  • Condition number

    cond(A) = c(A) = IIAIlIIA-III = amaxlamin. In Ax = b, the relative change Ilox III Ilx II is less than cond(A) times the relative change Ilob III lib II· Condition numbers measure the sensitivity of the output to change in the input.

  • Elimination matrix = Elementary matrix Eij.

    The identity matrix with an extra -eij in the i, j entry (i #- j). Then Eij A subtracts eij times row j of A from row i.

  • Ellipse (or ellipsoid) x T Ax = 1.

    A must be positive definite; the axes of the ellipse are eigenvectors of A, with lengths 1/.JI. (For IIx II = 1 the vectors y = Ax lie on the ellipse IIA-1 yll2 = Y T(AAT)-1 Y = 1 displayed by eigshow; axis lengths ad

  • Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

    A factorization of the Fourier matrix Fn into e = log2 n matrices Si times a permutation. Each Si needs only nl2 multiplications, so Fnx and Fn-1c can be computed with ne/2 multiplications. Revolutionary.

  • Free variable Xi.

    Column i has no pivot in elimination. We can give the n - r free variables any values, then Ax = b determines the r pivot variables (if solvable!).

  • Full column rank r = n.

    Independent columns, N(A) = {O}, no free variables.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Markov matrix M.

    All mij > 0 and each column sum is 1. Largest eigenvalue A = 1. If mij > 0, the columns of Mk approach the steady state eigenvector M s = s > O.

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Pascal matrix

    Ps = pascal(n) = the symmetric matrix with binomial entries (i1~;2). Ps = PL Pu all contain Pascal's triangle with det = 1 (see Pascal in the index).

  • Pivot columns of A.

    Columns that contain pivots after row reduction. These are not combinations of earlier columns. The pivot columns are a basis for the column space.

  • Projection matrix P onto subspace S.

    Projection p = P b is the closest point to b in S, error e = b - Pb is perpendicularto S. p 2 = P = pT, eigenvalues are 1 or 0, eigenvectors are in S or S...L. If columns of A = basis for S then P = A (AT A) -1 AT.

  • Rank one matrix A = uvT f=. O.

    Column and row spaces = lines cu and cv.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Row picture of Ax = b.

    Each equation gives a plane in Rn; the planes intersect at x.

  • Similar matrices A and B.

    Every B = M-I AM has the same eigenvalues as A.

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