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Solutions for Chapter 8.5: Partial Order Relations

Discrete Mathematics with Applications | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780495391326 | Authors: Susanna S. Epp

Full solutions for Discrete Mathematics with Applications | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780495391326

Discrete Mathematics with Applications | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780495391326 | Authors: Susanna S. Epp

Solutions for Chapter 8.5: Partial Order Relations

Solutions for Chapter 8.5
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Textbook: Discrete Mathematics with Applications
Edition: 4
Author: Susanna S. Epp
ISBN: 9780495391326

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 8.5: Partial Order Relations includes 51 full step-by-step solutions. Discrete Mathematics with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495391326. Since 51 problems in chapter 8.5: Partial Order Relations have been answered, more than 50914 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Discrete Mathematics with Applications , edition: 4.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Augmented matrix [A b].

    Ax = b is solvable when b is in the column space of A; then [A b] has the same rank as A. Elimination on [A b] keeps equations correct.

  • Big formula for n by n determinants.

    Det(A) is a sum of n! terms. For each term: Multiply one entry from each row and column of A: rows in order 1, ... , nand column order given by a permutation P. Each of the n! P 's has a + or - sign.

  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Cyclic shift

    S. Permutation with S21 = 1, S32 = 1, ... , finally SIn = 1. Its eigenvalues are the nth roots e2lrik/n of 1; eigenvectors are columns of the Fourier matrix F.

  • Diagonal matrix D.

    dij = 0 if i #- j. Block-diagonal: zero outside square blocks Du.

  • Eigenvalue A and eigenvector x.

    Ax = AX with x#-O so det(A - AI) = o.

  • Free columns of A.

    Columns without pivots; these are combinations of earlier columns.

  • Fundamental Theorem.

    The nullspace N (A) and row space C (AT) are orthogonal complements in Rn(perpendicular from Ax = 0 with dimensions rand n - r). Applied to AT, the column space C(A) is the orthogonal complement of N(AT) in Rm.

  • Independent vectors VI, .. " vk.

    No combination cl VI + ... + qVk = zero vector unless all ci = O. If the v's are the columns of A, the only solution to Ax = 0 is x = o.

  • Jordan form 1 = M- 1 AM.

    If A has s independent eigenvectors, its "generalized" eigenvector matrix M gives 1 = diag(lt, ... , 1s). The block his Akh +Nk where Nk has 1 's on diagonall. Each block has one eigenvalue Ak and one eigenvector.

  • Kirchhoff's Laws.

    Current Law: net current (in minus out) is zero at each node. Voltage Law: Potential differences (voltage drops) add to zero around any closed loop.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Least squares solution X.

    The vector x that minimizes the error lie 112 solves AT Ax = ATb. Then e = b - Ax is orthogonal to all columns of A.

  • Multiplicities AM and G M.

    The algebraic multiplicity A M of A is the number of times A appears as a root of det(A - AI) = O. The geometric multiplicity GM is the number of independent eigenvectors for A (= dimension of the eigenspace).

  • Orthogonal matrix Q.

    Square matrix with orthonormal columns, so QT = Q-l. Preserves length and angles, IIQxll = IIxll and (QX)T(Qy) = xTy. AlllAI = 1, with orthogonal eigenvectors. Examples: Rotation, reflection, permutation.

  • Random matrix rand(n) or randn(n).

    MATLAB creates a matrix with random entries, uniformly distributed on [0 1] for rand and standard normal distribution for randn.

  • Schwarz inequality

    Iv·wl < IIvll IIwll.Then IvTAwl2 < (vT Av)(wT Aw) for pos def A.

  • Semidefinite matrix A.

    (Positive) semidefinite: all x T Ax > 0, all A > 0; A = any RT R.

  • Skew-symmetric matrix K.

    The transpose is -K, since Kij = -Kji. Eigenvalues are pure imaginary, eigenvectors are orthogonal, eKt is an orthogonal matrix.

  • Vector v in Rn.

    Sequence of n real numbers v = (VI, ... , Vn) = point in Rn.

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