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Solutions for Chapter 9: Decision Theory

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321807090 | Authors: Irwin Miller

Full solutions for Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780321807090

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321807090 | Authors: Irwin Miller

Solutions for Chapter 9: Decision Theory

Solutions for Chapter 9
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Since 1 problems in chapter 9: Decision Theory have been answered, more than 292 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications, edition: 8. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 9: Decision Theory includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. Mathematical Statistics with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321807090.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Average run length, or ARL

    The average number of samples taken in a process monitoring or inspection scheme until the scheme signals that the process is operating at a level different from the level in which it began.

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Control limits

    See Control chart.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Designed experiment

    An experiment in which the tests are planned in advance and the plans usually incorporate statistical models. See Experiment

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Eficiency

    A concept in parameter estimation that uses the variances of different estimators; essentially, an estimator is more eficient than another estimator if it has smaller variance. When estimators are biased, the concept requires modiication.

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Forward selection

    A method of variable selection in regression, where variables are inserted one at a time into the model until no other variables that contribute signiicantly to the model can be found.

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications

  • Goodness of fit

    In general, the agreement of a set of observed values and a set of theoretical values that depend on some hypothesis. The term is often used in itting a theoretical distribution to a set of observations.

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