×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide

Solutions for Chapter 23: Inferences About Means

Stats: Modeling The World | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780131359581 | Authors: David E. Bock

Full solutions for Stats: Modeling The World | 3rd Edition

ISBN: 9780131359581

Stats: Modeling The World | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780131359581 | Authors: David E. Bock

Solutions for Chapter 23: Inferences About Means

Solutions for Chapter 23
4 5 0 249 Reviews
24
1
Textbook: Stats: Modeling The World
Edition: 3
Author: David E. Bock
ISBN: 9780131359581

Chapter 23: Inferences About Means includes 40 full step-by-step solutions. Since 40 problems in chapter 23: Inferences About Means have been answered, more than 43190 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Stats: Modeling The World was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780131359581. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Stats: Modeling The World , edition: 3.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Axioms of probability

    A set of rules that probabilities deined on a sample space must follow. See Probability

  • Backward elimination

    A method of variable selection in regression that begins with all of the candidate regressor variables in the model and eliminates the insigniicant regressors one at a time until only signiicant regressors remain

  • Block

    In experimental design, a group of experimental units or material that is relatively homogeneous. The purpose of dividing experimental units into blocks is to produce an experimental design wherein variability within blocks is smaller than variability between blocks. This allows the factors of interest to be compared in an environment that has less variability than in an unblocked experiment.

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Comparative experiment

    An experiment in which the treatments (experimental conditions) that are to be studied are included in the experiment. The data from the experiment are used to evaluate the treatments.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Correlation

    In the most general usage, a measure of the interdependence among data. The concept may include more than two variables. The term is most commonly used in a narrow sense to express the relationship between quantitative variables or ranks.

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Experiment

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • Exponential random variable

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Statistics - Textbook Survival Guide
×
Reset your password