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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 13: Binomial Distributions

Full solutions for The Basic Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780716774785

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 13: Binomial Distributions

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 13
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Textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics
Edition: 4
Author: David S. Moore
ISBN: 9780716774785

The Basic Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716774785. Since 36 problems in chapter Chapter 13: Binomial Distributions have been answered, more than 11151 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics, edition: 4. Chapter Chapter 13: Binomial Distributions includes 36 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Attribute control chart

    Any control chart for a discrete random variable. See Variables control chart.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Contour plot

    A two-dimensional graphic used for a bivariate probability density function that displays curves for which the probability density function is constant.

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Covariance matrix

    A square matrix that contains the variances and covariances among a set of random variables, say, X1 , X X 2 k , , … . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are the variances of the random variables and the off-diagonal elements are the covariances between Xi and Xj . Also called the variance-covariance matrix. When the random variables are standardized to have unit variances, the covariance matrix becomes the correlation matrix.

  • Deming

    W. Edwards Deming (1900–1993) was a leader in the use of statistical quality control.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

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