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Textbooks / Statistics / The Practice of Statistics 4

The Practice of Statistics 4th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

The Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781429245593 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes; Dan Yates; David S. Moore

Full solutions for The Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9781429245593

The Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781429245593 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes; Dan Yates; David S. Moore

The Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Solutions by Chapter
4 5 0 245 Reviews

Since problems from 12 chapters in The Practice of Statistics have been answered, more than 32702 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in The Practice of Statistics were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 09/04/17, 10:29PM. The Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781429245593. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Practice of Statistics, edition: 4. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 12.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Control limits

    See Control chart.

  • Defect

    Used in statistical quality control, a defect is a particular type of nonconformance to speciications or requirements. Sometimes defects are classiied into types, such as appearance defects and functional defects.

  • Defect concentration diagram

    A quality tool that graphically shows the location of defects on a part or in a process.

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Experiment

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Fisher’s least signiicant difference (LSD) method

    A series of pair-wise hypothesis tests of treatment means in an experiment to determine which means differ.

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function