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Classification and Properties of Matter (Sections)Give the

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward ISBN: 9780321696724 27

Solution for problem 13E Chapter 1

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Problem 13E

Problem 13E

Classification and Properties of Matter (Sections)

Give the chemical symbol or name for the following elements, as appropriate: (a) sulfur, (b)gold, (c) potassium, (d) chlorine, (e) copper, (f) U, (g) Ni, (h) Na, (i) Al, (j) Si.

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3/22/16 rimination in A Low­Wage Labor Market by Pager Et Al • Categorical exclusion ­ an immediate or automatic rejection of the black (or minority) candidate in favor of a white applicant • Shifting standards employers ’ evaluations of applicants appear actively shaped or constructed through racial lens • Race­based jobs channeling­ a process by which minority applicants are steered toward particular job types, often these characterized by greater physical demands and reduced customer contact Racializing The Glass Escalator by Wingfield • Previous works on Glass Escalator assume racial homogeneity of male workers • Intersection of race and gender ­ different experiences for different men • Focus on black men in nursing • Gendered racism/racialized gender ­ stereotypes, controlling images, beliefs ­ dangerous threats to white women (rape) • Positive attributes of homegmonic masculine nor available to men of color • Unpleasant interactions with women coworkers • Discriminatory relationships with supervisors ­ limited opportunities for promotion and upward mobility • White male nurses ­ “doctors” or “supervisors” • Black male nurses ­ “janitors” or “service workers” • Refusal of treatment by patients • Caring ­ to help patients and combat racial health disparities Family • What are the key characteristics of traditional family • What characteristics are central to the definition of family • How have these changed over time Has there been a stable definition of family Are any of these characteristics necessary and sufficient for defining a family • Were families in mid 20th century happier than families now • Consensus definition: “groups of individual is who cohabit and are related by blood in the first degree, marriage or adoption” Functionalist and Conflict Perspectives • How would a functionalist explain gendered division of work • Conflict perspective • What are your ideals about sharing the housework Families on the Fault Line: America’s Working Class Speaks About the Family, Economy, Race and Ethnicity by Rubin • Generational gap in expectation for (gendered) division of household tasks (younger men grant legitimacy to their wife ’s demands while older men generally do not) • Husbands share m any of the tasks but wives still bear full responsibility for the organization of the family life • Racial/ethnic difference — white male ­ sharing due to necessity (different work shifts among them and/or males being employed) • Asian and Latino men ­ residency in ethnic enclave • Child crd expenses ­ different shifts ­ strains on marriage and family life • Longer working hours ­ less time for family leisure • Strains on family life regardless of class, but higher income can alleviate such strains • Time and energy for sex ­ probably especially for two­job families Child Care Expenses ­ Whose Responsible • Is it couples ’ fault for their lack of family planning • What are the state of employer sponsored child ­ care in the U.S. • Government subsides • Paid maternity/parental leaves • In Japan, ­ Parental leave: you are eligible to receive public assistance (50% of the pay) from the government up to 1 year ­ You can continue receiving funds up to 1.5 years (the last 1/2 year lower amount) ­ Employer benefits­vary ­ Regular pay up to 8 weeks ­ 70% up to 1 year ­ Can take up a leave that is 3 years (without pay from employer for 2 years) ­ Smaller companies ­ different practices (patriarchal organization) Who Benefits From Existing Social Structure • “normal” Smash down all what you think is ­ constrained by socialization ­ ideologies to uphold the status quo ­ don’t take anything as “given” ­ society is by design, not “natural or “neutral” • Instead of focusing on individuals and “what they are supposed to do” — think in terms of what we as a community can do to ensure everyone’s well being, rights, access to resources • “My well­being depends on others well­being” Why Won’t African Americans Get and Stay • Marriage benefits, “norm” and idealized African Americans less likely to be and more likely to be females based households • Often pathelogized (immoral welfare dependency etc.) • Yet they often express greater support for traditional ideals and marriage • Marriage has been based in social norms and ideologies that were all odds with the cultural traditions and economic never institutionalized among them • Structural inequalities (class race and gender) ­ Higher income and educational affairs ­ Marriage and marital stability ­ Low income women are less likely to marry men who cannot continue to their economic support • Marriage ­ glorified as a norm, health and well­being, reduce poverty, children • But the benefits of marriage are not the same for every couples (interlocking systems of oppression) • Extended family relationships for children

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Chapter 1, Problem 13E is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

The full step-by-step solution to problem: 13E from chapter: 1 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 04/03/17, 07:58AM. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321696724. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 12. This full solution covers the following key subjects: appropriate, chemical, chlorine, Classification, copper. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 49 chapters, and 5471 solutions. Since the solution to 13E from 1 chapter was answered, more than 319 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “Classification and Properties of Matter (Sections)Give the chemical symbol or name for the following elements, as appropriate: (a) sulfur, (b)gold, (c) potassium, (d) chlorine, (e) copper, (f) U, (g) Ni, (h) Na, (i) Al, (j) Si.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 36 words.

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