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What are the anode and cathode reactions in a lead–acid

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro ISBN: 9780321809247 1

Solution for problem 23E Chapter 18

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition

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Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition

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Problem 23E

Problem 23E

What are the anode and cathode reactions in a lead–acid storage battery? What happens when the battery is recharged?

Step-by-Step Solution:
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Answer(a)chlorofluorocarbons:Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are a family of chemical compounds developed back in the 1930'sas safe, non-toxic, non-flammable alternative to dangerous substances like ammonia for purposesof refrigeration and spray can propellants. Their usage grew enormously over the years. One ofthe elements that make up CFCs is chlorine. Very little chlorine exists naturally in theatmosphere. But it turns out that CFCs are an excellent way of introducing chlorine into theozone layer. The ultraviolet radiation at this altitude breaks down CFCs, freeing the chlorine.Under the proper conditions, this chlorine has the potential to destroy large amounts of ozone.This has indeed been observed, especially over Antarctica. As a consequence, levels ofgenetically harmful ultraviolet radiation have increased.Hydrofluorocarbons :Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC), any of several organic compounds composed of hydrogen, fluorine,and carbon. HFCs are produced synthetically and are used primarily as refrigerants. Theybecame widely used for this purpose beginning in the late 1980s, with the introduction of theMontreal Protocol, which phased out the use of chemicals such as halons andchlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that contribute to the depletion of Earth’s ozone layer. However,while HFCs have an ozone depletion potential of zero, they are potent greenhouse gases, andthus their manufacture and use became increasingly regulated in the 21st century.Step 3As CFCs are diffused in the stratosphere ,they are exposed to high energy radiation ,which cancause photodissociation to produce Cl atoms .but HFC are potentially less harmful than CFCbecause their photo dissociation does not produce chlorine atoms which catalyses destruction ofglucose CF2Cl2(g)+hvCF2Cl(g)+Cl2(g) Cl(g)+O3(g)ClO(g)+O2(g).

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Chapter 18, Problem 23E is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry: A Molecular Approach
Edition: 3
Author: Nivaldo J. Tro
ISBN: 9780321809247

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What are the anode and cathode reactions in a lead–acid