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Why is the formation of water evidence of a chemical reaction Use a molecular-level

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9781439049402 | Authors: Steven S. Zumdahl, Donald J. DeCoste ISBN: 9781439049402 426

Solution for problem 6 Chapter 7

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation | 7th Edition

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Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9781439049402 | Authors: Steven S. Zumdahl, Donald J. DeCoste

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation | 7th Edition

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Problem 6

Why is the formation of water evidence of a chemical reaction? Use a molecular-level drawing in your explanation.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

14.4 THE CHANGE OF CONCENTRATION WITH TIME First-Order Reactions - first-order reaction – one whose rate depends on the concentration of a single reactant raised to the first power - if the rxn of the type A products is first order, the rate law is Rate = - ∆ A = k [A] ∆t - this form, which expresses how rate depends on concentration, is called differential rate law - this relationship can be transformed into an eqn known as integrated rate law for a first-order rxn that relates the initial concentration of A, [A] 0 to its concentration at any other time t, [A] t ln[A] t ln[A] =0-k t or

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Chapter 7, Problem 6 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation
Edition: 7
Author: Steven S. Zumdahl, Donald J. DeCoste
ISBN: 9781439049402

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Why is the formation of water evidence of a chemical reaction Use a molecular-level