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Solutions for Chapter 3: Matter Properties and Changes

Chemistry: Matter & Change | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780078746376 | Authors: McGraw-Hill Education

Full solutions for Chemistry: Matter & Change | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780078746376

Chemistry: Matter & Change | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780078746376 | Authors: McGraw-Hill Education

Solutions for Chapter 3: Matter Properties and Changes

Solutions for Chapter 3
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Textbook: Chemistry: Matter & Change
Edition: 1
Author: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN: 9780078746376

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 3: Matter Properties and Changes includes 109 full step-by-step solutions. Chemistry: Matter & Change was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780078746376. Since 109 problems in chapter 3: Matter Properties and Changes have been answered, more than 72225 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: Matter & Change, edition: 1.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • actinide series.

    Elements that have incompletely filled 5f subshells or readily give rise to cations that have incompletely filled 5f subshells. (7.9)

  • alkyl amines

    A format for naming amines containing simple alkyl groups.

  • arenium ion

    The positively charged, resonance-stabilized, intermediate of anelectrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. Also called a sigma complex.

  • cephalins

    Phosphoglycerides that contain ethanolamine.

  • colligative property

    A property of a solvent (vapor-pressure lowering, freezing-point lowering, boiling-point elevation, osmotic pressure) that depends on the total concentration of solute particles present. (Section 13.5)

  • conformation

    A three-dimensional shape that can be adopted by a compound as a result of rotation about single bonds.

  • critical pressure

    The pressure at which a gas at its critical temperature is converted to a liquid state. (Section 11.4)

  • crystalline solid.

    A solid that possesses rigid and long-range order; its atoms, molecules, or ions occupy specific positions. (11.4)

  • denatured protein.

    Protein that does not exhibit normal biological activities. (25.3)

  • Dienophile

    A compound containing a double bond (consisting of one or two C, N, or O atoms) that can react with a conjugated diene to give a Diels-Alder adduct.

  • dilution.

    A procedure for preparing a less concentrated solution from a more concentrated solution. (4.5)

  • dipole moment

    A measure of the separation and magnitude of the positive and negative charges in polar molecules. (Section 8.4)

  • disaccharide

    Carbohydrates comprisedof two monosaccharide units joined via aglycosidic linkage between the anomeric carbonof one monosaccharide and a hydroxyl group ofthe other monosaccharide.

  • Graham’s law

    A law stating that the rate of effusion of a gas is inversely proportional to the square root of its molecular weight. (Section 10.8)

  • intermetallic compound

    A homogeneous alloy with definite properties and a fixed composition. Intermetallic compounds are stoichiometric compounds that form between metallic elements. (Section 12.3)

  • molality

    The concentration of a solution expressed as moles of solute per kilogram of solvent; abbreviated m. (Section 13.4)

  • ortho

    On an aromatic ring, the C2 position.

  • phospholipid

    A form of lipid molecule that contains charged phosphate groups. (Section 24.9)

  • protein

    A biopolymer formed from amino acids. (Section 24.7)

  • replacement test

    A test for determining the relationship between two protons. The compound is drawn two times, each time replacing one of the protons with deuterium. If the two compounds are identical, the protons are homotopic. If the two compounds are enantiomers, the protons are enantiotopic. If the two compounds are diastereomers, the protons are diastereotopic.

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