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Solutions for Chapter 18: Molecular interactions

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Full solutions for Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780716787594

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Solutions for Chapter 18: Molecular interactions

Solutions for Chapter 18
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Textbook: Physical Chemistry
Edition: 8
Author: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula
ISBN: 9780716787594

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Physical Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716787594. Since 47 problems in chapter 18: Molecular interactions have been answered, more than 228705 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Physical Chemistry , edition: 8. Chapter 18: Molecular interactions includes 47 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 1,4-adduct

    The product obtained from 1,4-addition across a conjugated p system.

  • absolute zero.

    Theoretically the lowest attainable temperature. (5.3)

  • Aromatic compound

    A term used initially to classify benzene and its derivatives. More accurately, it is used to classify any compound that meets the Hückel criteria for aromaticity (Section 21.2A).

  • bromonium ion

    A positively charged, bridged intermediate formed during the addition reaction that occurs when an alkene is treated with molecular bromine (Br2).

  • Equivalent hydrogens

    Hydrogens that have the same chemical environment

  • ferrimagnetism

    A form of magnetism in which unpaired electron spins on different-type ions point in opposite directions but do not fully cancel out. (Section 23.1)

  • Gibbs free energy

    A thermodynamic state function that combines enthalpy and entropy, in the form G = H - TS. For a change occurring at constant temperature and pressure, the change in free energy is ?G = ?H - T?S. (Section 19.5)

  • Hammond postulate

    In an exothermic process the transition state is closer in energy to the reactants than to the products, and therefore the structure of the transition state more closely resembles the reactants. In contrast, the transition state in an endothermic process is closer in energy to the products, and therefore the transition state more closely resembles the products.

  • Hofmann rule

    Any b-elimination that occurs preferentially to give the less substituted alkene as the major product.

  • internal alkyne

    A compound with the structure R!C#C!R, where each R group is not a hydrogen atom.

  • lecithins

    Phosphoglycerides thatcontain choline.

  • Ligand

    A Lewis base bonded to a metal atom in a coordination compound. It may bond strongly or weakly.

  • liquid

    Matter that has a distinct volume but no specific shape. (Section 1.2)

  • localized lone pair

    A lone pair thatis not participating in resonance.

  • Nernst equation

    An equation that relates the cell emf, E, to the standard emf, E°, and the reaction quotient, Q: E = E° - 1RT>nF2 ln Q. (Section 20.6)

  • polyprotic acid

    A substance capable of dissociating more than one proton in water; H2SO4 is an example. (Section 16.6)

  • racemic mixture

    A mixture of equal amounts of the dextrorotatory and levorotatory forms of a chiral molecule. A racemic mixture will not rotate the plane of polarized light. (Section 23.4)

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • three-center, two-electron bonds

    A bond in which two electrons are associated with three atoms, such as in diborane (B2H6).

  • vinylic

    The carbon atoms of a carbon-carbon double bond.