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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 4: Statistics

Quantitative Chemical Analysis | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781429218153 | Authors: Daniel C. Harris

Full solutions for Quantitative Chemical Analysis | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9781429218153

Quantitative Chemical Analysis | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781429218153 | Authors: Daniel C. Harris

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 4: Statistics

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 4
4 5 0 327 Reviews
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Textbook: Quantitative Chemical Analysis
Edition: 8
Author: Daniel C. Harris
ISBN: 9781429218153

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Quantitative Chemical Analysis, edition: 8. Since 43 problems in chapter Chapter 4: Statistics have been answered, more than 65373 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Quantitative Chemical Analysis was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781429218153. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter Chapter 4: Statistics includes 43 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Avogadro’s hypothesis

    A statement that equal volumes of gases at the same temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of molecules. (Section 10.3)

  • axis of symmetry

    An axis about which a compound possesses rotational symmetry.

  • Beer’s law

    In UV-Vis spectroscopy, an equation describing the relationship between molar absorptivity (e), absorbance (A), concentration (C), and path length (l): e = A (C Ž l)

  • chemical shift (d)

    In an NMR spectrum, the location of a signal, defined relative to the frequency of absorption of a reference compound, tetramethylsilane (TMS).

  • conjugate base

    In an acid-base reaction, the product that results when an acid is deprotonated.

  • debye (D)

    A unit of measure fordipole moments, where 1 debye = 10-18 esu×cm.

  • disrotatory

    In electrocyclicreactions, a type of rotation in which the orbitalsbeing used to form the new s bond must rotate in opposite directions (one rotates clockwise while the other rotates counterclockwise).

  • Exergonic reaction

    A reaction in which the Gibbs free energy of the products is lower than that of the reactants. The position of equilibrium for an exergonic reaction favors products.

  • Hydrophilic

    From the Greek, meaning water-loving.

  • imidazole

    A compound containing a five-membered ring that is similar to pyrrole but has one extra nitrogen atom at the 3 position.

  • Imide

    A functional group in which two acyl groups, RCO! or ArCO!, are bonded to a nitrogen atom

  • matter waves

    The term used to describe the wave characteristics of a moving particle. (Section 6.4)

  • mixture

    A combination of two or more substances in which each substance retains its own chemical identity. (Section 1.2)

  • molal freezing-point-depression constant (Kf)

    A constant characteristic of a particular solvent that gives the decrease in freezing point as a function of solution molality: ?Tf = -Kf m. (Section 13.5)

  • Nucleotide

    A nucleoside in which a molecule of phosphoric acid is esterifi ed with an !OH of the monosaccharide, most commonly either the 39!OH or the 59!OH.

  • polar covalent bond

    A bond in which the difference in electronegative values of the two atoms is between 0.5 and 1.7.

  • resonance

    A method that chemists use to deal with the inadequacy of bond-line drawings.

  • Thermoset plastic

    A polymer that can be molded when it is fi rst prepared, but once cooled, hardens irreversibly and cannot be remelted.

  • torsional strain

    The difference in energy between staggered and eclipsed conformations (for example, in ethane).

  • tosylate

    An excellent leaving group (OTs). transition state (Sect. 6.6): A state through which a reaction passes. On an energy diagram, a transition state corresponds with a local maximum.