Solutions for Chapter 3: Stereoisomerism and Chirality

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9781133952848 | Authors: William H. Brown, Brent L. Iverson, Eric Anslyn, Christopher S. Foote

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9781133952848

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9781133952848 | Authors: William H. Brown, Brent L. Iverson, Eric Anslyn, Christopher S. Foote

Solutions for Chapter 3: Stereoisomerism and Chirality

Solutions for Chapter 3
4 5 0 269 Reviews
17
1
Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 7
Author: William H. Brown, Brent L. Iverson, Eric Anslyn, Christopher S. Foote
ISBN: 9781133952848

Chapter 3: Stereoisomerism and Chirality includes 36 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Organic Chemistry was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9781133952848. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 7. Since 36 problems in chapter 3: Stereoisomerism and Chirality have been answered, more than 4679 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • atomic weight

    The average mass of the atoms of an element in atomic mass units (amu); it is numerically equal to the mass in grams of one mole of the element. (Section 2.4)

  • Autoxidation

    Air oxidation of materials such as unsaturated fatty acids.

  • band gap

    The energy gap between a fully occupied band called a valence band and an empty band called the conduction band. (Section 12.7)

  • Benzyl group (C6H5CH2!)

    The group derived from toluene by removing a hydrogen from its methyl group.

  • crystal lattice

    An imaginary network of points on which the repeating motif of a solid may be imagined to be laid down so that the structure of the crystal is obtained. The motif may be a single atom or a group of atoms. Each lattice point represents an identical environment in the crystal. (Section 12.2)

  • crystallization

    The process in which molecules, ions, or atoms come together to form a crystalline solid. (Section 13.2)

  • doping

    Incorporation of a hetero atom into a solid to change its electrical properties. For example, incorporation of P into Si. (Section 12.7)

  • Electron affinity

    Energy added or released when an electron is added to an atom or molecule.

  • force

    A push or a pull. (Section 5.1)

  • gray (Gy)

    The SI unit for radiation dose

  • Living polymer

    A polymer chain that continues to grow without chain-termination steps until either all of the monomer is consumed or some external agent is added to terminate the chain. The polymer chains will continue to grow if more monomer is added.

  • mass

    A measure of the amount of material in an object. It measures the resistance of an object to being moved. In SI units, mass is measured in kilograms. (Section 1.4)

  • molar mass

    The mass of one mole of a substance in grams; it is numerically equal to the formula weight in atomic mass units. (Section 3.4)

  • polycarbonates

    Polymers that are similar in structure to polyesters but with repeating carbonate groups (!O!CO2!) instead of repeating ester groups (!CO2!). polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  • porphyrin

    A complex derived from the porphine molecule. (Section 23.3)

  • resonance stabilization

    The stabilization associated with the delocalization of electrons via resonance.

  • stereospecific

    A reaction in which the configuration of the product is dependent on the configuration of the starting material.

  • strong activators

    Groups that strongly activate an aromatic ring toward electrophilic aromatic substitution, thereby significantly enhancing the rate of the reaction.

  • Triglyceride (triacylglycerol)

    An ester of glycerol with three fatty acids

  • vinylic carbocation

    A carbocation in which the positive charge resides on a vinylic carbon atom. This type of carbocation is very unstable and will not readily form in most cases.

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Organic Chemistry

Forgot password? Reset password here

Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Organic Chemistry
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here